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Elizabeth Stewart-Severy

Environment Reporter

Aspen native Elizabeth Stewart-Severy is excited to be back at the Red Brick, where she attended kindergarten, to report on all things environmental. She has spent her entire life playing in the mountains and rivers around Aspen. She attended the University of Colorado with a Boettcher Scholarship and graduated as the top student from the School of Journalism in 2006. Her lifelong love of hockey lead to a stint working for the Colorado Avalanche, and she still plays in local leagues and coaches the Aspen Junior Hockey U-19 girls.

Elizabeth received a Master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Colorado, and she returned home to teach journalism and English at her alma mater, Aspen High School, in 2009. As a teacher, she helped young people better understand their world and tell stories that matter. Under Elizabeth’s leadership, the AHS student newspaper, the Skier Scribbler, has expanded to win local, state and national awards and now also hosts a multimedia website.

Elizabeth is excited to combine her passions for understanding the natural environment and telling important stories; if you find her toppled off her mountain bike somewhere, please give her a hand.  

Ways to Connect

On Friday, an Aspen-based organization awarded $250,000 to 10 groups working on solutions to climate change.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

For centuries, humans’ relationship with animals has been related to use and utility. Scientists are now delving into more complex understanding of our fellow creatures. Seeing birds of prey up close offers a chance to appreciate both the evolutionary science — and the emotional beauty of raptors.

What is a university if not a true marketplace of ideas — a place where scholarly pursuits in a wide range of subjects can be nurtured and questioned, where crosscurrents of diverse thought and perspectives can co-exist?

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Inspectors at Ruedi Reservoir have spotted invasive mussels on two boats so far this summer, and officials think there are more to come.

Traditional notions of masculinity emphasize strength and power and devalue attributes like vulnerability and emotional openness. At a very young age, most boys learn that being successful means becoming dominant, that winning matters most, and that tears are a sign of weakness.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

On Tuesday, officials from Pitkin County will host a public meeting where they are the ones listening. The forum in Carbondale is meant to gather public input on a major trail proposal in the Crystal River Valley.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Communities of color and those living in poverty are more likely than others to be exposed to air pollution, toxic waste and water contamination than others in the United States, and studies show the impacts of climate change will also hit these communities harder. Environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy recently spoke with two men who have spent their lives deeply engaged in fighting for civil rights and are now tackling climate activism.

 

COURTESY OF THE OFFICE OF GOV. JOHN HICKENLOOPER

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper recently signed an executive order that requires that Colorado adopt low-emission vehicle standards, following a model set by California. It’s part of your plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions statewide.

Zoe Rom / Aspen Public Radio

The United States stands alone as the only country on the planet to reject the Paris Accord.

Despite repeated attempts, Congress has not repealed the Affordable Care Act, although the Trump Administration has chipped away at some of its provisions. The requirement that all insurance plans offer “ten essential benefits” has been softened and the individual mandate to carry a minimum level of coverage has been repealed.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

The federal government has reached a settlement in an ongoing legal battle over drilling in the Thompson Divide area of the White River National Forest.

 

Courtesy photo

Off-road vehicles like ATVs and dirt bikes have long been banned on public roads in Colorado, but Pitkin County is only starting to enforce the law this summer.

www.instagram.com/packywestfeldt

Low river flows and hot weather could be particularly tough on area fish. A local organization is asking boaters and anglers to chip in on a science project aimed at protecting trout.

Courtesy of Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

In 2016, the world’s largest investment firm issued a report saying that climate change must be a factor in money management. On Wednesday, BlackRock Vice Chairman Philipp Hildebrand will discuss sustainable investing.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Eight wildfires now burn in Colorado, and Roaring Fork Valley communities are under fire restrictions because of hot, dry, windy conditions.

www.wild.org

The 2018 AREDAY Summit kicks off today, and it includes conversations about setting aside half of the world for nature.

 

Courtesy of Wild Rose Education

A handful of middle and high school students from across the Roaring Fork Valley spent the week learning about climate change and making films.

 

At a meeting Thursday, elected officials will discuss two ways to improve alternative transportation near Aspen.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Stage one fire restrictions went into effect Tuesday in Pitkin and Eagle Counties because of dry conditions and high temperatures.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

People, plants and animals all enjoy the nearly 5,000 acres of land owned by Pitkin County Open Space and Trails. To make sure the shared space remains a thriving ecosystem, Open Space and Trails is turning to data collected on site.

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