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Elizabeth Stewart-Severy

Environment Reporter

Aspen native Elizabeth Stewart-Severy is excited to be back at the Red Brick, where she attended kindergarten, to report on all things environmental. She has spent her entire life playing in the mountains and rivers around Aspen. She attended the University of Colorado with a Boettcher Scholarship and graduated as the top student from the School of Journalism in 2006. Her lifelong love of hockey lead to a stint working for the Colorado Avalanche, and she still plays in local leagues and coaches the Aspen Junior Hockey U-19 girls.

Elizabeth received a Master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Colorado, and she returned home to teach journalism and English at her alma mater, Aspen High School, in 2009. As a teacher, she helped young people better understand their world and tell stories that matter. Under Elizabeth’s leadership, the AHS student newspaper, the Skier Scribbler, has expanded to win local, state and national awards and now also hosts a multimedia website.

Elizabeth is excited to combine her passions for understanding the natural environment and telling important stories; if you find her toppled off her mountain bike somewhere, please give her a hand.  

Ways to Connect

This week, voters approved a tax increase to help fund Crown Mountain Park in El Jebel. The City of Aspen said it's close to reaching settlement agreements with some of the groups who oppose its work to retain rights to build reservoirs on Castle and Maroon Creeks. And Basalt Town Council is anticipating the same housing issues that Aspen now dealing with.

www.facebook.com/aspenpolice

Aspen police are asking city council to approve a new law aimed at keeping people from harassing wildlife. It comes amid growing concerns about public safety — and the health of local bears.

Two local filmmakers are bringing the story of Roaring Fork Valley farmers to the big screen. The award-winning documentary “How We Grow” makes its home premiere this weekend.

Courtesy of Ann Mullins

Aspen city councilmember Ann Mullins was among elected representatives from five mountain communities who traveled to Washington D.C. last week. They were there with the advocacy group Mountain Pact.

Alycin Bektesh

This January, Aaron Million filed a claim for water on the Green River, with plans to divert it to Colorado’s Front Range. The proposal, and the many objections filed in response to it, have raised questions about just how much water is available from the Colorado River and its tributaries.

Courtesy of Wilderness Workshop

The City of Aspen is making progress toward settlement in a state water court case regarding storage rights on Castle and Maroon Creeks.

www.aspenfire.com

Tuesday is the last day to cast a ballot for Aspen’s Fire Protection District board of directors.

Bureau of Land Management

The federal government has released plans to ease restrictions on oil and gas development near sage grouse habitat, including changes to Colorado's plan.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Stream flows in the Roaring Fork watershed are slowly creeping upward, but the effects of this winter’s low snowpack are already showing.

Courtesy of Eric Mitchell, True Nature Healing Arts

This spring, 5 Point Film teamed up with a nonprofit called Big Heart Big Hands to host a panel discussion about the trauma and loss involved in backcountry rescue and recovery. Big Heart Big Hands raises money for mountain rescue teams and provides counseling support to those impact by mountain incidents.

The conversation was held in kiva at True Nature Healing Arts in Carbondale. We pick up with moderator Bobby L'Heureux of Big Heart Big Hands.

 

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Results from a valley-wide survey are in, and they show strong support for allowing some e-bikes on paved trails.

Courtesy of Big Heart Big Hands

Journeys into the backcountry allow adventurers to find inspiration and pursue challenging feats. But what happens when those adventures turn to tragedy? The non-profit Big Heart Big Hands supports those impacted by backcountry trauma. Last month, they co-hosted a panel discussion with 5 Point Film. It focused on the ripple effect of trauma and loss that hits communities.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

The U.S. Forest Service announced its final decision Monday to log 1,600 acres of national forest in the upper Fryingpan valley. Some areas have been removed from the project after public objections.

 

Officials hope to improve water quality, fish habitat and a diversion structure along the Crystal River in Carbondale.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Gov. John Hickenlooper signed a bill this week that provides funding for a state program to prevent the spread of invasive species into Colorado’s lakes and reservoirs. The pressure is still on local authorities to cover most of the cost of boat inspections.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Pitkin County commissioners approved an update to the county’s hazard mitigation plan Wednesday. It comes as officials are preparing for a dry, hot summer and increased wildfire danger.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

At the end of this week, local energy groups will name one area high school the winner of the Changemakers Challenge. It’s a social media contest to award environmental engagement, and the kickoff featured its own teenage changemaker.

Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife

The state wildlife agency is reminding people to take steps to protect newborn animals this spring, and it starts with adhering to trail closures.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio

5 Point Film Festival is underway in Carbondale, and the offerings go beyond adventure films.  On Saturday, 5 Point will co-host a discussion about the impacts of backcountry rescue missions.

www.roaringfork.org

Earth Day is Sunday, April 22, but celebrations kick off in Aspen on Thursday.

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