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Valley Roundup

Fridays at 3:30pm

In our survey of the week’s top stories, Valley Roundup brings together a panel of guest journalists who provide additional insights, analysis and context to the news. Valley Roundup goes beyond the headlines with reporters and editors discussing issues important to the Roaring Fork Valley.  These journalists are keeping an eye on local government, public utilities, the environment, the arts and much more.  On Valley Roundup each week, they’ll be in casual conversation about the stories they cover and why they matter to us.   

Valley Roundup is more than just a week-in-review – it’s your connection to your community and beyond.

Hosted by a rotatimg member of the APR news team, guests include editors and reporters from The Aspen Daily News, The Aspen Times, The Glenwood Springs Post Independent, and others.  

Valley Roundup received a Colorado Broadcasters Association (CBA) Award of Excellence for Best Public Affairs Program in 2015. 

Support for Valley Roundup on Aspen Public Radio comes from Balcomb and Green, PC, a full-service law firm with offices in Glenwood Springs, Aspen, and Basalt. Learn more at www.balcombgreen.com.

Ways to Connect

  This week: a midvalley park needs more money, and wants property owners to supply it, Snowmass Village is prepping for summer, and Carbondale will announce new public art this month.

This week, Alycin Bektesh is joined by Curtis Wackerle, editor for the Aspen Daily News, Jason Auslander, reporter with the Aspen Times, and Samuel Bernal, of Radio LaTricolor.    

This week, host Alycin Bektesh is joined by Madeleine Osberger, contributing editor for the Aspen Daily News, David Krauss, editor of the Aspen Times, and Cindy Hirschfeld, editor-in-chief of Aspen Sojourner magazine.

On this week's special Valley Roundup, Alycin Bektesh talks with Ken Rudin, host of NPR's Political Junkie, about the current political climate and what might be coming up in the 2018 elections. 

This week, host Alycin Bektesh is joined in the studio by Aspen Times reporter Rick Carroll and Aspen Public Radio’s Wyatt Orme. She also checks in with Aspen Daily News Columnist Mick Ireland.

Host Alycin Bektesh is joined by Christine Benedetti, editor of Aspen Magazine, Curtis Wackerle, editor of the Aspen Daily News, and Auden Schendler, author of Getting Green Done. His article How to fix the mountain town housing crisis was recently published in Outside Magazine.

This week on Valley Roundup, we discuss the political tug-of-war over the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program and touch base with local recipients of the program, otherwise known as DREAMers. Also, Aspen Valley Hospital is giving their terminally ill patients the option to end their own lives by opting in to a state law, passed last year. And, the X Games kicked off Thursday, as two local skiers had podium finishes in the superpipe.

Alycin Bektesh, Wyatt Orme and Madeleine Osberger from the Aspen Daily News go beyond the headlines and dig deeper into the week's news.  

This week on Valley Roundup, we look back at some of the most interesting and important stories of the year. 2017 has been a politically charged year across America, and many national issues are very real on a local level in the Roaring Fork Valley too. Local “Dreamers” rallied in Glenwood Springs. The Aspen Film Fest Academy Screenings grapple with the #MeToo movement. Aspen City Council dealt with things like tobacco, chain stores and water rights.

This week, we look back at the defining news events of 2017.

This week, Basalt's Pan and Fork property is back in the news: The developer is out, the landowner is angry, and the town council is shaking its head. Latino families in the Roaring Fork Valley are discovering public education isn’t their only choice here. Also, Snowmass turns 50 this weekend.

  This week, National Monuments take a hit, a trail along the Crystal River becomes a dividing line, an effort continues to turn private land into a public amenity and how a federal tax overhaul would affect the valley

This week, we talk with Randy Essex, editor and publisher of the Glenwood Springs Post Independent, about some of the biggest stories he's covered in his time in the Roaring Fork Valley. Essex is leaving his post for the Motor City, where he will be senior content director for business and auto news at the Detriot Free Press. 

 

This week, there have been more allegations of sexual harassment at the Colorado statehouse.

The City of Aspen has some work to do to prove that it should hold on to conditional water rights on Castle and Maroon Creeks, and is considering pulling funding from the Wheeler’s stockpile to buy land in Woody Creek. The school district is also interested in the Wheeler’s excess funds.

This week, the votes are in. The Aspen School District Board of Education gets a new member, tax questions supporting Colorado Mountain College and Garfield County historical societies are shot down by voters, but taxes on tobacco and pot to help fund public health initiatives pass.

This week, the Colorado Department of Transportation announced its plans to reopen the Grand Avenue Bridge earlier than expected. On Tues. Nov. 7, ballots for the 2017 election are due. Aspen voters will decide on a tobacco tax and how the city will buy land in Woody Creek. Garfield County’s voters will decide whether or not to fund the county’s historical societies. And, on Monday, Aspen held an open house for the public to learn about the different options for replacing Lift 1A on Aspen Mountain.

This week, a local immigration rights activist took sanctuary in a Carbondale church. There’s a freeze on some land-use applications in the mid-valley, and a long-debated Aspen project is sneaking back into the picture. The doors are still closed at Justice Snow's, an Aspen restaurant, while city council discusses its fate. And Coloradans are expecting to pay much more for health care next year.

 

Valley Roundup for Oct. 6, 2017

Oct 5, 2017

 

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

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