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Roaring Fork Conservancy

Zoe Rom

All across Colorado and the Roaring Fork Valley, leaves are changing colors a bit ahead of schedule.

Courtesy of Christy Rose

Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) announced Thursday that it is lifting some fishing restrictions, and increasing others.

This summer, the Roaring Fork, Frying Pan and Crystal Rivers have all reached near-historic lows, as low as 30 percent of average flow. This has many, from anglers to ecologists, concerned for trout. As the West becomes increasingly drought-prone and the climate continues to warm, fishermen and conservation groups are working together to protect the valley’s fish.

 

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

The Roaring Fork Conservancy celebrated the opening of its new headquarters Friday with a special guest: Gov. John Hickenlooper.

www.instagram.com/packywestfeldt

Low water levels and high temperatures are causing stress to fish in the Roaring Fork Valley, so experts are asking anglers to stop fishing in the mid-afternoon.

Colorado River District

The Colorado River District holds an event in Carbondale Thursday to unite scientists and stakeholders in discussing pressing issues facing local water users.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

At a meeting this week, Garfield County Commissioners agreed to continue funding ongoing work to improve the health of Cattle Creek.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Stream flows in the Roaring Fork watershed are slowly creeping upward, but the effects of this winter’s low snowpack are already showing.

Officials hope to improve water quality, fish habitat and a diversion structure along the Crystal River in Carbondale.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

On Monday, Aspen City Council will consider funding a project to tell the story of the John Denver Sanctuary.

Last month, students from across the Roaring Fork Valley gathered to discuss water. At the first-ever Youth Water Summit, teenagers presented their own white papers on everything from water rights to environmental activism.

Courtesy of Roaring Fork Conservancy

The Roaring Fork Conservancy works to educate people on exploring and protecting its watershed. This year’s Roaring Fork Watershed Photo Contest reflects the organization's mission.

A law that passed last year in Colorado allows residents to capture and use rainwater for outdoor irrigation. As Roaring Fork Valley homeowners rely on weather patterns and natural cycles for their water supply, it's teaching them how to manage a scarce resource.

Courtesy of Community Office for Resource Efficiency

This will be the first full summer that Colorado residents can legally use rain barrels to conserve water. Local organizations are helping people learn how.

courtesy of Roaring Fork Conservancy

In this politically charged year, environmentalists from across the country are planning for Earth Day marches and other activities to show support for science on Saturday, April 22.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Immigrants who are new to Roaring Fork Valley schools often come from warm, tropical countries. A partnership between Basalt High School and the Roaring Fork Conservancy aims to help students understand their new environment.

Aspen Public Radio News

A 14-mile stretch of Cattle Creek in Garfield County falls on Colorado’s list of impaired rivers. The Roaring Fork Conservancy has been monitoring this stream. Environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy recently joined the nonprofit to follow the creek from its headwaters on National Forest land to the confluence near Highway 82.

Aspen Public Radio News

The City of Aspen hosted an open-house discussion last week about its water rights to build reservoirs on Maroon and Castle creeks, but interested locals still have a lot of questions.

Marci Krivonen

Dry February weather melted snow in the high country, but snowpack levels are still substantial. A healthy level of snow up high is important for everyone down low, particularly farmers and ranchers. A crew of snow surveyors and high-tech systems are already sending readings about snowmelt. Marci Krivonen explains.

It’s a calm and sunny February day at 8700 feet above sea level. Snow surveyor Derrick Wyle plunges a long metal tube into deep snow on McClure Pass, south of Carbondale.

Hunter Baar

 

Results are in from testing done after a release of water from Grizzly Reservoir last month turned the Roaring Fork River a dirty yellow.

The discoloration happened in mid-August after a dam problem forced the release of between 10 and 20 acre feet of water from Grizzly Reservoir on Independence Pass. The water flowed into Lincoln Creek and eventually into the Roaring Fork River. It raised alarm because of its color.

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