KAJX

'People Want That Old Garage': Marc Maron Talks 'WTF' And Stand-Up

I n 2009, Marc Maron was a struggling stand-up comic. With nothing to lose, he began experimenting with podcasting, and was one of the first to do so. Now, millions of listeners download each episode of his show, “WTF,” to hear his long, informal -- often intimate -- conversations with creative people.

Read More

Colorado lawmakers are now more than halfway through the legislative session, and they’ve debated at length over oil and gas regulations and how the state votes for presidents.

But one issue has been notably absent so far from the agenda: Transportation funding.

It’s been four months since voters rejected two tax measures that would have provided billions of dollars worth of funding for the state’s roads and bridges.

nwcoloradohunting.com

Colorado Parks And Wildlife (CPW) announced big changes in game management this week.

 

Marci Krivonen

Colorado’s legislature is considering a Red Flag Bill, which aims to remove guns from people who pose an extreme threat to themselves or others. If it passes, police, family members could petition a judge to have someone’s guns removed for up to one year.

Post-workout recovery is a strange world of ice baths, float tanks, foam rollers and even infrared pajamas. Christie Aschwanden is the author of “GOOD TO GO: What the Athlete in All of Us Can Learn From the Strange Science of Recovery.” Her new book dives into the science and pseudoscience behind athletic recovery.

Brent Moss

The Green Is The New Black fashion show in Carbondale features original clothing, all created from sustainable materials.  

The designs on the runway might be made with organic cotton or hemp, or be up-cycled (created from previously worn items). Some fabrics may even come from pineapple and coconut fibers, or old plastic bottles.

 

Mike McMillan / Lake Christine Fire PIO

On Tuesday, Basalt approved state and federal grants that will help with flood prevention work in the wake of the Lake Christine Fire.

Pitkin County

 On Wednesday, Pitkin county commissioners will renew funding for a program that’s meant to increase citizens' access to mental health care.

 

"A CEO, a climate scientist and an artist walk into a bar..." This is not the beginning of a joke, but the premise for a panel Tuesday night, called “Future Energy.”

On a recent afternoon, Jeff Blevins left Sopris Liquor and Wine in Carbondale with a bottle of vodka in a brown paper bag.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio News

At their meeting tonight, Basalt’s Town Council is expected to stop collecting taxes on cigarettes and other tobacco and nicotine products. The tax was raising too much money.

Pages

ASPEN PUBLIC RADIO EVENT

Join Us For A Night Of Conversation With NPR's Kirk Siegler

Friday, March 29th, 6:30 p.m. at The Temporary in Basalt

Paris to Pittsburgh

Paris to Pittsburgh Screening & Panel Discussion

Thursday April 4th, 5:30pm Free screening and panel discussion.

ARTS & CULTURE

Welcome to the beginning of another week in the Roaring Fork Valley! This is Week in the Arts, a curated list of upcoming exhibitions and events.

Christin Kay / Aspen Public Radio

When you think of sports in the Roaring Fork Valley, you might think skiing, hiking, but what about fencing? The founder of the Roaring Fork Fencing Club wants to share his passion for what he calls a "cerebral sport," and kids are catching on.

In 2009, Marc Maron was a struggling stand-up comic. With nothing to lose, he began experimenting with podcasting, and was one of the first to do so. Now, millions of listeners download each episode of his show, “WTF,” to hear his long, informal -- often intimate -- conversations with creative people.

State News

The basement of the state Capitol is ground zero for legislative strategizing. Lobbyists take over the small cafeteria and crowd around tables with lawmakers for several hours. Some walk into the bathrooms still talking on their phones about legislation. It’s here in this noisy basement where the oil and gas industry has been mounting fierce opposition to stronger regulations on the industry.

After days of fierce partisanship at the state Capitol, Democrats in the Colorado Senate advanced a bill Wednesday that will give local governments more control over oil and gas drilling operations.

But as the bill heads over to the House for more debate, there are signs it will undergo some more changes in the coming days.

Colorado lawmakers are now more than halfway through the legislative session, and they’ve debated at length over oil and gas regulations and how the state votes for presidents.

But one issue has been notably absent so far from the agenda: Transportation funding.

It’s been four months since voters rejected two tax measures that would have provided billions of dollars worth of funding for the state’s roads and bridges.

THANK YOU

Thank You To Everyone Who Donated This Winter & To All Current Members

If you didn't get a chance to contribute, you still can.

Ways To Listen to Aspen Public Radio

Listen To Aspen Public Radio Anywhere

Smart phone, smart speaker