KAJX

Rectify, a new drama series from the Sundance Channel, wants to stand out from the pack — and it certainly succeeds at that. It's a six-hour limited series, more along the British model of TV than ours here in the States. If these first six installments catch on enough, the story will continue. If not, that's it.

And Rectify is so unusual a show, with its own deliberate pace and premise and approach, that it may not build enough viewership to keep going. But that doesn't mean it's not a worthwhile show, or a memorable one — because it is.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

The latest developments in the investigation into the bombings at the Boston Marathon and related news include:

Update at 7:36 p.m. ET. Suspect Unarmed When Arrested:

When police cornered Dzhokhar Tsarnev in a boat in Watertown, they said they traded fire with the Boston bombing suspect.

A suspect is in custody after five people were reportedly shot to death in Manchester, Ill., a town of 300 or so residents about 90 miles north of St. Louis, The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports.

Public health authorities in Taiwan have identified the first human case of a new type of bird flu seen outside China.

The development, while not unexpected, points to the potential spread of a new type of bird flu that has, according to the World Health Organization, sickened at least 108 people and been implicated in 22 deaths.

"The @AP Twitter account, which was suspended after being hacked, has been secured and is back up. Thank you for your patience."

That's the word Wednesday morning from The Associated Press.

We all deserve a break from the past week's news. This NASA video could be just the right thing.

"Clashes broke out between protesters and riot police near France's lower house of parliament late on Tuesday just hours after the country legalized gay marriage, with opponents of the law hurling projectiles at police, who responded with tear gas," France 24 reports.

Even al-Qaida gloats about what's possible under U.S. gun laws. In June 2011, a senior al-Qaida operative, Adam Gadahn, released a video message rallying people to take advantage of opportunities those laws provide.

"America is absolutely awash with easily obtainable firearms," Gadahn says, explaining that "you can go down to a gun show at the local convention center" and buy a gun without a background check.

Then a faint smile crosses Gadahn's face. "So what are you waiting for?" he asks.

Pages

Meet The Candidates

2019 Aspen Municipal Elections

Council and Mayoral Candidates

APR Has A New Show!

Aspen Public Radio's newest public affairs program Air Time is a show that allows us a little more time with the astounding people and ideas that come through our valley.

Mountain Edition

Mountain Edition is Aspen Public Radio's weekly newsmagazine. The show focuses on news, analysis, and commentary about Aspen and the Roaring Fork Valley.
Valley Roundup brings together a panel of guest journalists who provide additional insights, analysis and context to the news.

ARTS & CULTURE

"The Quiet Force" is a film about the Latino workforce in American ski towns. It’s screening at the 5Point film festival at the Wheeler Opera House this weekend. The subject of undocumented workers is particularly timely in the face of the partial government shutdown over funding for a border wall.  

Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo visits Aspen on Saturday. The all-male dance troupe parodies classics like "Swan Lake" while in drag.

The Aspen Art Museum plans to hold a series of talks this year looking at empathy.

Kaywin Feldman, the first speaker in the series, helped launch the Center for Empathy and the Visual Arts at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. She says people can learn compassion, and art can teach it.

 

State News

Gov. Jared Polis wants to leverage Colorado's stronger than expected revenue projections to pay for full-day kindergarten next school year.

He's asking lawmakers to approve $227 million in the budget for the kindergarten classes.

Polis says the spending will allow 30,000 families to stop paying tuition.

More Americans are being impacted by what is now the longest government shutdown in U.S. history. This week, the already stressful world of air travel is feeling the pinch as Transportation Security Administration workers call in sick.

But for now, things are still operating smoothly at Denver International Airport.

DIA spokeswoman Emily Williams said the average wait time at security checkpoints averaged about 10 minutes on Sunday.

Sen. Chris Holbert is adapting to life in Colorado's legislative minority.

"We will have our say but not our way," he said in a speech on Jan. 4, the opening day of the session. "We have the voice, but not the votes."

So how does a lawmaker without the votes approach his job? Here are three takeaways from KUNC's interview with the Republican minority leader the day before the session gaveled in.

APR's Community Calendar

Ways to listen to Aspen Public Radio

You can stream Aspen Public Radio

on all of your smart devices