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'Climate Whiplash' Tests Four Corners Communities' Ability To Adapt

Climate change has been called the new normal. But residents in some parts of the Southwest say after living through the last two years, there’s nothing normal about it. Communities in the Four Corners -- where the borders of Colorado, Utah, New Mexico and Arizona meet -- have been bouncing between desperately dry and record-breaking moisture since the winter of 2017, forcing people dependent on the reliability and predictability of water to adapt.

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Pro Challenge May Have More Security

Apr 18, 2013
Photo Courtesy of USA Pro Challenge

Colorado sporting events may see more security after the bombings at the Boston Marathon on Monday, April 15th. One of the biggest events in Aspen this summer is the USA Pro Challenge. The road bike race in its third year. Now, state and local officials are looking closely at whether to beef up security.

Photo by Elise Thatcher

Part 3 of a 3 part series.

Pitkin County residents are making less money than ten years ago. That’s one of the findings in a recent economic sustainability report released by the Aspen Chamber Resort Association. One of the reasons could be that paychecks aren’t keeping up with inflation. Aspen Public Radio's Elise Thatcher reports.
 

Photo by Marci Krivoen

Part 2 of a 3 part series.

It’s tough to open and run a business in Aspen these days. New business owners must navigate a web of regulations and fees. And, stores already in operation are battling a tough economy nationally, and within the resort itself. Retail sales are a good indicator of a resort’s economic health. And, while sales data show Aspen has largely recovered from the recession, the retail sector has seen no real sales growth for six years.  Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

Aspen’s Economic Challenges: Part #1 - Lodging

Apr 15, 2013
Roger Adams

Part 1 of a 3 part series.

Residents of Aspen often hear and say that they live in paradise; it is a town like no other.  And yet, the Aspen of this description is facing challenges in coming years. That’s the conclusion of a report issued last week by the Aspen Chamber Resort Association.    ACRA’s Economic Sustainability Report revisits issues considered by a similar study done ten years ago.

Fayhee Leaves Mountain Gazette

Apr 12, 2013
Photo from John Fayhee

“When in doubt, go higher.” That’s the motto of the Mountain Gazette, the Colorado-born magazine that’s documented the slings and arrows of mountain living here and across the West.

Usually at the heart of the publication are long tales by the colorful and often curmudgeonly editor John Fayhee. He helped the resurrect the Gazette thirteen years ago. That was in collaboration with well known Aspen figure. Well, Fayhee’s in serious doubt... and deep regret... about the future of the magazine--so he’s saying goodbye. Fayhee recently spoke with Aspen Public Radio's Elise Thatcher.

211 Crew in the Valley

Apr 11, 2013
Photo from the Institute for the Study of Violent Groups

The murder of Colorado’s head of corrections last month is being blamed on a member of the white supremacist prison gang known as the 211 Crew.  Police killed the suspect but a manhunt continues for another 211 member who remains at large and might be involved.  The gang was formed in the Denver County Jail in the 1990’s and since then some of it’s members have found their way to the Roaring Fork Valley. Aspen Public Radio's Roger Adams reports.

Photo from NPR

This spring has been a tough one in Aspen due to a succession of suicides. News of the deaths was hard to miss. Reports were carried by media outlets, including Aspen Public Radio. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports:

Some mental health providers say there was too much coverage. 

"I gotta tell you, we had the busiest day yesterday in the entire three years almost that the Hope Center has been in business, says Michelle Meuthing.

Police Trying to Crack ATM Fraud

Apr 9, 2013
Photo from Aspen Police Department

Investigators are still trying to figure out what happened at several Aspen ATMs in late March. The criminals withdrew thousands of dollars with fake debit and credit cards. But the big question remains... how were they able to make the cards in the first place? Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher has this report.

Hunters in Colorado are threatening to boycott the state this year over new gun laws... and if they make good on their promise the protest could end up hurting wildlife across the state. The fees hunters pay make up more than half of the state’s wildlife budget. 

Below is a transcript of reporter Elise Thatcher's story:

Marci Krivonen

There’s a house in Old Snowmass unlike any other home in the Roaring Fork Valley, or in the world for that matter. The home Amory Lovins shares with his wife doesn’t have a furnace and it creates more energy than it uses.

Lovins is a scientist who founded Rocky Mountain Institute, an energy and environmental think tank. He’s become one of the world’s foremost thinkers on energy efficiency. And, he gets some of that inspiration from what he calls the “Banana Farm." Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

 

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ARTS & CULTURE SUPPORTED BY THE EDLIS NEESON FOUNDATION

Welcome to another week in the Roaring Fork Valley! This is Week in the Arts, a curated list of upcoming exhibitions and events.

Courtesy Shining Mountains Film Festival


The Shining Mountains Film Festival comes to Aspen this weekend, bringing stories from, and about, Native Americans.

 

The festival is put on by the Wheeler Opera House, Aspen Film and the Aspen Ute Foundation.  Deanne Vitrac-Kessler, the executive director of the Aspen Ute Foundation, says the mission is to give a voice to indigenous filmmakers and performers. 

Christin Kay / Aspen Public Radio

 


Murals are perhaps the most public of public art, available to anyone who happens to be walking by.  Creating murals is pretty public, too.  L.A. artist Bunnie Reiss was in Carbondale last week to paint a forty-five-foot-tall wall on the side of Batch above the Third Street Plaza.

 

Since Reiss’ canvas is a towering wall, her studio is a hydraulic lift. It shuttles her up and down and side to side as she paints a forty-foot-tall deer, surrounded by purple columbines and other native Colorado flowers.   

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State News

Elise Thatcher


Coloradans who purchase their health insurance on the individual marketplace can expect to save even more money next year than lawmakers originally thought.

 

Governor Jared Polis says premiums on the marketplace will go down by an average of twenty point two percent next year thanks to a new reinsurance program. The savings will be two percent higher than what the state projected in July.

Jim Hill/KUNC

  A Colorado group opposed to hydraulic fracturing - fracking -- has announced a lawsuit seeking to halt new oil and gas drilling permits until updated regulations are in place.

 

Joe Salazar, attorney for “Colorado Rising”,  says the Denver District Court complaint alleges the state is issuing drilling permits under rules made obsolete by a new law.

Colorado Department of Trnsportation

Colorado transportation officials have announced plans to install new technology along Interstate 70 that would increase the speed limit through Glenwood Canyon.

The Colorado Department of Transportation expects to increase from 50 to 60 mph for most parts of the 14-mile canyon during good weather conditions.