2022 Aspen Public Radio
APR20_webHeader_SpringVersion4
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
People from around the Roaring Fork Valley have all been impacted in some way by the COVID-19 pandemic. Now many are sharing their experiences to collect and memorialize the valley’s COVID-19 pandemic history.“Quarantine Stories: Recording History" is a community oral history project from Aspen Public Radio and Aspen Historical Society, featuring self-recorded interviews from individuals and families during these historic times.You can participate by interviewing your family or telling us your story. What are you feeling and seeing? What motivates you? What scares you? What is the day like outside your window?00000176-6d2a-dc2f-ad76-6d2a4f990001Record and send in an audio clip to be preserved in perpetuity in the Aspen Historical Society archive. The future may be uncertain, but together we can capture history happening in real time.There are two easy ways to submit your recording:1. Record it as voice memo on your smartphone and email it to aspenpublicradio@gmail.com.2. Call 970-812-3726 and leave your story as a voicemail00000176-6d2a-dc2f-ad76-6d2a4f9b0000Support for “Quarantine Stories: Recording History" comes from Aspen Center for Environmental Studies educating for environmental responsibility since 1968.*By submitting your story, you agree to it being aired on Aspen Public Radio and archived for future use by Aspen Historical Society for educational and archival purposes as set forth here.

Morgan Reed: Staying Connected

gshs_-_morgan.jpg
Post Independent
/

 

How do you build connections when you can’t see your friends at school every day? Morgan Reed, a junior at Glenwood Springs High School, said she has been searching for the answer. 

 

“I’ve been keeping up with my two best friends almost every day since my last real day of school, but it’s harder to continue a friendship that was born purely from being in the same class with someone and never really grew from that point,” she said.

One way that Reed and her close friends have stayed connected is through virtual movie screenings. Every day, they FaceTime and watch a movie "together." They even held a superhero movie marathon. 

 

“Because we haven’t seen each other in person in over two months, having them there to ensure our bond doesn’t go away has been the only thing keeping me from going crazy with isolation,” she said.