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Alex Hager

Reporter

Alex comes to Aspen from KDLG, the public radio station in Dillingham, Alaska. There, he served as a “fish reporter,” producing nightly broadcasts for a fleet of boats in the world’s largest sockeye salmon fishery. Living in a town of 2,500 people that was only reachable by plane and boat taught him about the profound value that public radio can bring to a community. His Alaskan reporting escapades included a bush plane trip to a tiny fishing village on the South Peninsula, in-depth breakdowns of salmon biology, and conversations with mining executives about the Pebble Mine project. 

Before his time in Alaska, Alex spent four years at Elon University in North Carolina. There, he was a reporter for Elon News Network, where he covered just about every beat for just about every medium. Highlights include stories of Venezuelan students watching their country’s crisis from afar, a week of breaking news reporting on Hurricane Florence, and coverage of UNC Chapel Hill’s Confederate statue controversy. 

While at Elon, Alex also worked as a sports correspondent for the Burlington Times-News, covering ACC football and basketball as well as Carolina Panthers NFL football. 

When he’s not in the office, Alex enjoys hiking, practicing Spanish, playing basketball, and reading poetry. He was born and raised in Connecticut. 

Alex Hager / Aspen Public Radio

Across the nation, upgrades are coming to the way wireless signal reaches the phone in your pocket. Small cell technology, as it’s called, will lead to the installation of lots of new transmitters. Due to a combination of state and federal regulations, Aspen will not have much control over that process when the cells come to town.

Vaping360 via Creative Commons

Colorado has the highest rate of youth electronic cigarette use in the nation, and use among high schoolers in Pitkin County is among the highest in the state. Now, the county is considering measures to change that.

via Google Earth


Last week, private garbage and recycling company Waste Management said it would cost $120,000 to operate a public recycling drop-off center in Basalt next year, more than double what it cost in 2019. The firm says that comes in response to higher drop-off fees at a larger facility in Denver.

 

Alex Hager / Aspen Public Radio

The City of Aspen released the results of its latest citizen survey this week. The annual questionnaire measures resident attitudes about living in Aspen and the city’s government.

Overall, respondents gave the city high marks in categories such as safety and protecting the environment, but were dissatisfied with livability.

Alex Hager / Aspen Public Radio

Learning to ski can be awkward. After squeezing into a tight pair of boots and waddling to the lift, a first trip down the bunny hill can be full of challenges. But once you start getting the hang of things, there’s that unbeatable rush.

“Your heart starts racing,” said 18-year-old Alisha Geary. “Your mood changes, your attitude shifts. It's just amazing. You kind of have to experience it yourself, you know?”

Alex Hager / Aspen Public Radio

As the professional ski season gets underway, some of the world’s best racers have been training at Aspen Highlands. The list of skiers who trained on Golden Horn in the early season includes the Swiss men’s alpine team and American star Mikaela Shiffrin. 

Creativity103 via Creative Commons

A recycling center in Basalt is set to close at the start of 2020 after Pitkin County decided to stop funding it, and residents are now turning to Eagle County in hopes of a solution.

Alex Hager / Aspen Public Radio

The Roaring Fork Transit Authority unveiled its new electric buses in a ceremony at Rubey Park on Tuesday. Over the course of the next month, eight new electric buses will join RFTA’s fleet of about 90 total buses.

Alex Hager / Aspen Public Radio

On Monday, the Snowmass Town Council got a look at the size and location of buildings that would make up a proposed overhaul of Snowmass Center. Richard Shaw, a landscape architect working with Eastwood Snowmass on plans for the renovations, led a tour for council members and residents. 

Alex Hager / Aspen Public Radio

The City of Aspen hosts a “Feedback Forum” next week, where officials are hoping to get public input on four different city projects. The open meetings will be held on Dec. 4 at the Limelight hotel in Aspen.

via National Renewable Energy Laboratory

The news website Vox recently published an article titled “Colorado’s cleanest energy options are also its cheapest.” The author, David Roberts, spoke with Aspen Public Radio about his findings. Roberts’ full article can be read here.

Courtesy of CLEER

Tuesday night, the Carbondale Board of Trustees was presented with a year-end rundown of accomplishments by Clean Energy Economy for the Region (CLEER). The Carbondale-based organization collaborates with the Town of Carbondale and Garfield County to assist in the adoption of renewable energy.

Courtesy of Colorado Department of Transportation

Almost a million Coloradans will travel for Thanksgiving this year, according to AAA Colorado. But heavy snowfall could complicate travel ahead of the holiday.

Austin Transportation Department (Creative Commons)

The City of Aspen is asking if dockless mobility is a good fit for its streets.

From Seattle to Miami, and plenty of cities in between, there has been buzz abound about dockless mobility. The term refers to bikes and scooters that riders pick up using an app on their phones, and then abandon at their destination.

via Colorado Sierra Club

The decision to bring back wolves to Colorado could end up in the hands of the state’s voters next year. An initiative to to put wolf reintroduction on 2020 ballots has garnered momentum and sparked a conversation about the benefits and drawbacks of the animal’s return.

Alex Hager / Aspen Public Radio

A new district ranger will soon take the helm of the Aspen-Sopris Ranger District. Kevin Warner will be in charge of approximately 750,000 acres of land in the White River National Forest, including five wilderness areas, five ski resorts and the Maroon Bells Recreation Area.

Alex Hager / Aspen Public Radio

Molly Dove, Morning Edition Host: In its meeting a couple of weeks ago, the Pitkin County Board of Commissioners talked about whether or not to accept a piece of donated land, just upvalley of Woody Creek off of Juniper Hill Road. When they first considered accepting the donated land, there were some questions raised as to whether or not the county should do so. To help break it down, we're joined by reporter Alex Hager. Give us some background on this, where exactly is this land that we're talking about?

Alex Hager / Aspen Public Radio

This story was updated at 12 p.m. Tuesday to include more details about the upcoming opening.

It’s official, skiing in Aspen will be getting started early for the second year in a row. The Aspen Skiing Company announced Monday that Aspen Mountain and Snowmass will both open for daily operations on Saturday, Nov. 23. That date is five days ahead of the originally scheduled opening day.

Alex Hager / Aspen Public Radio

The road to the Maroon Bells closed for the winter on Friday morning. Before the route shut down for the season, a few intrepid visitors made their way up to the iconic spot to enjoy a frosty day on the lake.

“It’s literally like skating in a cathedral,” said Blake Greiner, who was passing a hockey puck with a friend. “It’s pretty wild. It’s a temple out here.”

via Pitkin County Board of Commissioners

 

The Pitkin County Board of Commissioners voted unanimously to approve the development of a new solar farm near Woody Creek on Wednesday evening. The decision came after an extensive special meeting that featured the presentation of studies of the project’s potential impacts to the area and a lengthy public comment period.

Alex Hager / Aspen Public Radio

 

Tuesday night, dozens of demonstrators gathered outside of Glenwood Springs High School to show their support for those protected by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, also known as DACA. The Obama-era program covers immigrants who were brought into the United States when their parents entered illegally.

Alex Hager / Aspen Public Radio

Across the nation, changes are coming to the way cell signal reaches people’s phones. A new technology called “small cell” is being installed nationwide at the behest of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). Before Aspen installs the new transmitters, the city is gathering public opinion about how it should do so.

Ryer Gardenswartz / Aspen Public Radio

Numbers from around the Roaring Fork Valley show slightly more than a third of registered voters cast a ballot on election day 2019, according to unofficial counts on Thursday afternoon.

All three counties also delivered among the lowest turnout rates in the state. Out of Colorado’s 64 counties, Pitkin, Eagle and Garfield all posted turnout percentages ranking in the bottom seven.

 

Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife

On Monday, the Garfield County Board of Commissioners voted unanimously to oppose “any efforts to introduce or expand the population of wolves in Colorado.”

A wildlife advocacy group is collecting signatures to put wolf reintroduction on statewide ballots in 2020. Proponents of reintroduction say they would help restore a natural order that was lost when they were hunted to near extinction in the 1940s.

Ryer Gardenswartz / Aspen Public Radio

Voting ends at 7 p.m. tonight and there are a number of ways to cast your ballot in today's election.

It’s too late to mail ballots in, but they can still be deposited at any 24-hour ballot drop box until 7 p.m. 

Is isn’t even too late to register to vote. Voter Service and Polling Centers will be open today, where voters can go to register, get a ballot and cast votes in-person, right up until polls close at 7 p.m.

Courtesy of Trees, Water & People

 

Friday night the Rocky Mountain Institute is hosting a talk about the causes of migration out of Central America. Sebastian Africano is the executive director of Trees, Water & People, a Colorado-based organization that works to address those root causes.

Before giving the talk, he stopped by the Aspen Public Radio studios to talk about those issues, and ways to make change.

 

Alex Hager / Aspen Public Radio


It’s a dark October night in Aspen, and there’s a chill in the air. That’s not unusual for late fall in the Rockies. But tonight, there’s even more reason to feel a shiver. We’re on a journey through decades of macabre mountain tales with a tour called “Aspen’s Dark Side.”

Courtesy Sunlight Mountain Resort

November has yet to arrive, but below-freezing temperatures have allowed resorts in the area to fire up their snow guns.

“We woke up to about two degrees below zero this morning and no wind associated with that, which is important too,” said Troy Hawk, marketing director at Sunlight Mountain Resort in Glenwood Springs. “When you make snow, you don’t want it to all blow off and into the trees.”

Courtesy Mountain Family Health

Earlier this month, a controversial immigration rule from the Trump administration was put on hold by federal judges in five different states. Although the new regulation has not yet been put into law, it is still having an impact in the Roaring Fork Valley.

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