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Patrick Fort

Arts & Culture Reporter

Patrick Fort grew up in the suburbs of Pittsburgh, nurturing a love for ice hockey and deli sandwiches. After moving to Colorado in 2010 to attend the University of Colorado to study music, Patrick discovered his love for journalism. In 2013, Patrick created and hosted the award-winning radio program Colorado Stories, a news program that covered CU and the surrounding community. An avid mountain and road cyclist, Patrick also referees youth ice hockey. He loves '60s pop bands and and trying new recipes ranging from milk-braised carnitas to flourless cakes.

Curated - Aug. 29

Aug 30, 2016
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  There are four films making U.S. debuts at next month’s festival. It starts with “Certain Women,” which premiered at Sundance Film Festival, and features Michelle Williams, Kristen Stewart and Laura Dern in a portrayal of the intersection of their lives in Montana.

 Clay National XI closes at the R2 Gallery in Carbondale on Monday.

 

As fall returns...go on a ghost tour of Aspen on Tuesday night.

 

The Sunset Sounds series continues in Glenwood Springs.

 

Wednesday night is Foreign FIlm Night at the Basalt Public Library. The great Japanese film “Nobody Knows” is being screened.

 

It’s the closing weekend of Shakespeare in the Park from the Hudson Reed Ensemble.

 

Analog Son is a Denver-based funk group making their JAS Labor Day experience debut this weekend. They’re opening for the R and B legend, Stevie Wonder. One of the group’s members, Jordan Linit, spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Patrick Fort about this opportunity and what it means to them.

    

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Shakespeare in the Park has been an Aspen staple for a decade. “As You Like It” is one of Shakespeare’s more fantastical plays, and is this year’s work of choice from the Bard. But rather than using more fantastical tropes like in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” “As You Like It” is described as a pastoral comedy.

The Aspen Institute.

The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra performs the third and final night of its series in Aspen this evening at the Benedict Music Tent.

 

The group is playing in the ninth week of music events from the Aspen Music Festival and School (AMFS).

 

It’s the first time this decade that an event has been held after students left over the last week.

 

Representatives from AMFS said it was part of their ongoing plan to help benefit the business community and maintain activity in Aspen.

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When Tom Voss and Anthony Anderson returned from their tours of duty in Iraq, they came back changed men. They were dealing with moral injuries, more than physical ones. Both were dealing with post traumatic stress disorder.

Curated - Aug. 22

Aug 22, 2016
Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Mark Beauregard was a reporter, but made a decision to write a book after thinking about Herman Melville’s Moby Dick. Melville had a close relationship with Nathaniel Hawthorne, another American writer. They wrote letters to each other that suggest that they were more than friends. Melville’s writing was often about his life, yet Moby Dick is almost always seen as an allegory. Beauregard was struck by this comparison and decided to write about the relationship between Melville and Hawthorne.

 

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The 67th year of the festival began with a ceremony dedicating new offices and practice spaces at the Bucksbaum campus in Aspen. Music festival president and CEO Alan Fletcher listed all of the people who were responsible for the renovations at the event.

“We owe so much to community members, the city of Aspen, our patrons our volunteers, all of our donors,” Fletcher said at the dedication in July.

  On Tuesday, the opening reception for the “Surface as Cipher” exhibition starts at five at Anderson Ranch.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Back in the 1970s,  while Andy Stone worked at the Aspen Times, he was questioning himself. He felt that all newspaper reporters had a novel in them. So he decided to follow suit.

His first novel, “Song of the Kingdom”, was published by Doubleday in 1979. After that book’s release, he decided he’d take another crack at the publishing world.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Colorado is investing millions of dollars in the arts throughout the state. The money supports film, public art programs and the state’s creative district program, which tries to help rural economies grow through the arts. In the Roaring Fork Valley, municipalities are figuring out ways to incorporate public art, and make their towns a great place to support artists. In just the past month, the relationship between the arts and government has evolved.

courtesy donaldjtrump.com

 A trio of Republican Governors spoke at the McCloskey speaker series last night in Aspen. Matt Bevin (KY), Pete Ricketts (NE)  and Lawrence Hogan Jr. (MD) discussed the upcoming presidential election how their state’s economies have improved under their leadership.

 

When asked about Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, Bevin said he would not endorse the candidate, but would be voting for him in the upcoming election.

 

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Tonight, Aspen City Council will hear from the Parks Department about how to handle new public art pieces and the installation process.

Curated - Aug. 15

Aug 15, 2016
Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Governor John Hickenlooper’s book “The Opposite of Woe: My Life in Beer and Politics” was released earlier this year. He spoke with Aspen Public Radio arts reporter Patrick Fort before a book signing in Aspen last week.

  The Aspen Santa Fe Ballet performs on Tuesday at the Aspen District Theatre.

 

The Basalt Public Library will screen “Some Like it Hot” on Wednesday.

 

Dirty Heads play at the Belly Up in Aspen on Wednesday.

 

Artist Hank Willis Thomas speaks at the Aspen Art Museum on Thursday.  

 

Maraca and His Latin Allstars perform at the JAS Cafe at the Little Nell on Friday.

 

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

This year's Red Brick Center for the Arts Plein Air Festival comes to a close Sunday.  “Plein Air” is a French term, meaning “in full or open air”. That’s the attraction for the nearly two dozen participants, including Peter Campbell, of Durango.

Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper is presenting his book, The Opposite of Woe: Life in Beer and Politics, this afternoon at Explore Booksellers in Aspen

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

The Snowmass Concert series finishes tonight on Fanny Hill. This summer, most of the shows have avoided the anecdotally present rain that seems to have interfered in previous seasons. The series featured music industry veterans like Taj Mahal and newcomers like Jamestown Revival.

 The Aspen Art Museum held its annual ArtCrush fundraising event on Friday. The museum netted $2.5 million, and was exactly what was expected, according to Aspen Art Museum CEO Heidi Zuckerman. That number is the same compared to last year’s event.

The “Wheeler Wins” program was launched in November by the Wheeler Opera House as a way to make shows more affordable and provide other benefits. There are more than 400 members so far.

 

Wheeler executive director Gena Buhler said the membership numbers are encouraging.

 

That’s especially important to her because last week, the City of Aspen gave the Wheeler Opera House over $100,000 to help bring in bigger acts. The money came from the real estate transfer tax.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

It was announced last week that the Wheeler Opera House received over $100,000 to supplement its programming budget. Executive director Gena Buhler said this new money will mean bigger acts, and steadier ticket prices for locals. Buhler spoke with arts reporter Patrick Fort about what this all means.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

There’s a bridge in Rifle that runs over a stream. On the two main support columns are two very different visual elements. On one side, mud smeared everywhere — graffiti style. On the other side? Rifle’s latest piece of public art.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

explore. evolve. elevate. opens tonight at the Red Brick Center for the Arts.

 

Ceramic artist Michael Bonds is featured in the show, as well as Molly Peacock. The exhibition also includes a retrospective on the work of Betty Weiss, who passed away in November.

 

Weiss had a studio in the Red Brick for almost two decades. Red Brick executive director Angie Callen told Aspen Public Radio in November the 90-year-old artist was an institution in the building.

 

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ArtAspen opens at the Aspen Ice Garden tomorrow. Bernie Taupin — Elton John’s songwriter —  will display his art. Taupin is a mixed-media artist and uses paint, rope and other materials to create abstract pieces.

 

The show features art shown in galleries from New York, Santa Fe, Miami and Los Angeles.

 

Events also include a lecture from sculptor and University of Northern Colorado graduate, Gino Miles, called “From Greeley to Aspen and All of the Places in Between”.  

Curated - Aug. 22

Aug 1, 2016

Curated features Sheriff Joe DiSalvo, Jeff Feuerzig, Anna Noyes and Jess Worley. 

  JT LeRoy penned two bestselling novels before it was discovered that he didn’t exist. LeRoy was a pen name used by Laura Albert - that became a little too real. Albert’s relative even went out in public as LeRoy. Jeff Feuerzeig heard about the story and decided to make a film about it. “Author: The JT LeRoy Story”, documents the creation and eventual breakdown of the JT LeRoy personality.

  

Chris Isaak performs at the Belly Up on Monday as part of his “First Comes the Night Tour”.

 

Tuesday night is the next event in the McCloskey Speaker Series from the Aspen Institute. Experts will discuss the presidential race as it looks after the conventions.

 

Aspen Film is screening the film “Norman Lear: Just Another Version of You on Wednesday.

 

Nigel Hall plays in Glenwood Springs as part of the Summer of Music.

 

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