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Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

Alex Hager / Aspen Public Radio

Autumn is officially here. The nights are getting colder, the days are getting shorter, and aspen trees on hillsides around the valley are starting to turn from green to gold. 

It's exactly those changes — less sunlight and chillier temperatures that are causing the leaves to change. 


Elizabeth Stewart-Severy


Development and climate change are top threats to wildlife habitat and biodiversity, and in the arid west, water supply is a consistent concern for all kinds of life. But ecologists see a simple, natural way for ecosystems to be more resilient: beavers. 

When local ecologist Delia Malone walks along the Crystal River in Carbondale, she sees something missing. This footpath runs through an area that used to flood during spring runoff, but with the combination of development and climate change, it doesn’t anymore. Malone said it’s also in part because there are no beavers on this stretch of river. 

Courtesy of Bowman Leigh, Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

 

Project Drawdown is a research organization that identifies the one hundred most viable and impactful solutions to climate change. Founder Paul Hawken was in Aspen last weekend and sat down with reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy.   

Courtesy of Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

 

The Aspen Center for Environmental Studies (ACES) celebrates its 50th anniversary this weekend with a lecture on solution to climate change.

In his 2017 book “Drawdown,” environmentalist Paul Hawken outlines a comprehensive plan to reverse climate change. He’ll discuss the policies and technologies needed to make that happen with ACES CEO Chris Lane tomorrow night. Lane said Hawken brings unparalleled expertise and optimism.

 

Courtesy photo

When Reverend Lennox Yearwood, Jr., founded the political action organization Hip Hop Caucus, his focus was on inspiring young people to get involved in civic issues.

Climate change is now a top priority for the group, and Yearwood is in Aspen to discuss the connections between environmental advocacy and civil rights.

Aspen Center For Environmental Studies

Local contractors and architects can learn about affordable green building at an active construction site in Carbondale on Tuesday.

The ACES Urban Farmhouse is an affordable housing project for the organization’s environmental educators.

 

 


Talks Focus On Colorado River Health

Feb 11, 2019
Colorado River Water Conservation District

The Roaring Fork Conservancy in Basalt hosts a talk Tuesday night about managing the Colorado River in a hotter, drier world.

Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

Fungi are some of the ecosystem’s unsung heroes. The Aspen Center for Environmental Studies (ACES) is giving them their day in the sun on Friday at Mushroom Fair.  

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

A panel discussion Tuesday will address what the changing climate means for recreation, agriculture and local economies.

Courtesy of 5Point Adventure Film

5Point Adventure Film will present two nights of film screenings at the Wheeler Opera House this weekend. This will be a primer for the 6th annual film festival taking place in Carbondale this April.

Courtesy of Aspen Center for Environmental Studies/aspennature.org

Jasmine Finks has spent years rehabilitating injured osprey and educating people about the birds of prey. Finks was in Aspen last week as part of the Naturalist Nights speaker series and sat down with Elizabeth Stewart-Severy.

Courtesy of aspennature.org

Three local environmental groups are again teaming up to present a speaker series focused on public lands and wildlife conservation. The schedule for 2018 is out.

Week in the Arts: Oct. 9, 2017

Oct 9, 2017

 

Welcome to the beginning of another colorful fall week in the Roaring Fork Valley!

 

Tuesday through Friday, The Wheeler Opera House will be hosting a series of events in commemoration of John Denver. For a complete events schedule, visit wheeleroperahouse.com.

 

Courtesy of Ami Vitale

National Geographic photographer Ami Vitale started her career documenting war and conflict but has since shifted to covering wildlife and environmental issues. She has traveled to more than 90 countries and is in Aspen to share her photos and stories. Environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy talked with Vitale about her work.

Courtesy of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

July in Aspen is peak tourist season. As part of a monthly series on Roaring Fork wildlife, Elizabeth Stewart-Severy checked in on some visitors from the south who are in the middle of some critical work this summer. It’s time for migratory birds to stretch their wings.

“We must understand and define conservation and social justice as our collective self-preservation – a rationale that crosses all boundaries between all people.”

Courtesy of Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

Young and newborn wildlife often attract the attention of well-meaning citizens. Wildlife agencies and local nonprofits are reminding people to keep their distance.

courtesy of Roaring Fork Conservancy

In this politically charged year, environmentalists from across the country are planning for Earth Day marches and other activities to show support for science on Saturday, April 22.

Courtesy of Protect Our Winters

Alongside the swag, food, and festivities at World Cup Village at Wagner Park, ski racers and fans alike will have a chance to take political action.

Courtesy of www.aspentrailfinder.com

The Aspen Center for Environmental Studies (ACES) beat out two other local organizations for a $3,000 grant from Aspen Trail Finder.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Some of Snowmass’ oldest residents recently returned to their old stomping grounds.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

The Naturalist Night lecture series kicks off Wednesday evening in Carbondale, beginning another season for a Roaring Fork Valley staple.

The National Audubon Society has been overseeing Christmas Bird Counts for 117 years - the longest running citizen science program in the world.

Courtesy of aspennature.org

After the American wolf population was decimated to levels nearing extinction, there have been significant efforts in recent decades to help restore populations of both red and grey wolves. A lecture Tuesday looks at the future for wolves in Western Colorado.

Courtesy of Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

The Aspen Center for Environmental Studies (ACES) recently handed out hundreds of free National Parks passes to elementary students in Aspen, Basalt and Glenwood Springs.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

The Aspen Skiing Company announced yesterday that it is accepting applications for grants to support environmental projects.

 

Aspen Public Radio News

Pitkin County Open Space and Trails is making it official: protecting biodiversity is more important than recreation. A new policy focuses on preserving natural habitats, even if that means keeping some areas closed to humans.

Post-fire weed pull in Hunter Creek on Saturday

Jul 6, 2016
Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio

Five local organizations are teaming up to organize a community weed pull this Saturday in the Hunter Creek Valley following a prescribed burn in the area in May.

Patrick Fort|Aspen Public Radio News

We’ve reached a point in civilization where there is no place on Earth that a human hasn’t influenced. It is up to us now to keep as much as possible wild.

 

 This is from the Cross Current archives. This program takes an in depth look at the recent prescribed burn in the Hunter Creek Valley, why it was scheduled and what results can be expected.

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