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City of Aspen Environmental Health

A bear of a problem at Aspen's recycling center

Sep 26, 2017
Carolyn Sackariason / Aspen Public Radio

Bear activity in downtown Aspen is at an all time high this fall, and officials are urging people to secure their trash. Bad human behavior at the recycling center on Rio Grande Place is proving to be a challenge for Liz Chapman, who is the city’s waste reduction and environmental health specialist. Each morning, she picks up garbage that bears got into. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason joined her to talk about the problem.

Courtesy of City of Aspen

Drivers interested in going electric can test out cars today in Aspen.

 

A decade ago, City of Aspen officials identified a goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 30 percent by the year 2020. But, with just three years left on that target, those emissions are down only 7.5 percent. Workers with the Canary Initiative, Aspen’s climate team, are devising a new plan that will identify specific steps to make progress.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

It’s an idyllic scene out of a ski resort ad: After a long day skiing, return home and warm your bones by the roaring fire. Donnie Lee, general manager at the Gant, knows the appeal this has for visitors.

Aspen Public Radio News

Aspen’s environmental health department wants drivers to cut unnecessary emissions.

On Monday night, Aspen council members approved a request to work with the Department of Energy to learn more about the city’s greenhouse gas emissions.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

As the Pitkin County Landfill heads toward capacity, the City of Aspen is turning its focus to the largest garbage producer in the valley: construction and demolition projects. But reducing the volume of this trash is no simple matter.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Aspen City Council is scheduled to discuss renewing its contract to monitor air quality today. As Elizabeth Stewart-Severy reports, this is part of an ongoing effort to reduce pollution.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio

Last night, Aspen City Council approved an ordinance to fine heavy duty diesel vehicles that emit too much smoke.

 

The new law localizes a state-wide regulation that requires diesel vehicles to keep emissions below 40 percent opacity, which is the measure of the particulate in smoke from trucks. Trucks are periodically stopped and tested; six of the 33 trucks at a test conducted earlier this summer failed.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio

The City of Aspen is dipping its toes into the realm of food security and encouraging residents to grow their own vegetables and herbs.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio

The City of Aspen is looking to curb emissions, and soon truck drivers could face a $500 fine for excess exhaust smoke.