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Climate Change

Courtesy Kate Howe

New billboards painted by local artists using ink made from carbon soot go up around the Roaring Fork Valley Tuesday. The four billboards are part of the Imagine Climate project which aims to bring together art and science to inspire climate action.

Nancie Battaglia

 


Bill McKibben first wrote about the changing climate more than 30 years ago, and he continues to document global warming and speak out against the largest culprits. Most recently, he was arrested while protesting Chase Bank’s ties to the fossil-fuel industry.

McKibben will be in Aspen this weekend, learning to downhill ski and speaking as part of Aspen Skiing Company’s occasional speaker series Aspen U.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Journalism


Just as new research shows that aspen forests are a fountain of biodiversity, Aspen’s namesake trees in the Roaring Fork River watershed are battling warming temperatures, drier conditions, climate disruption, and unchecked herds of deer and elk. Although local aspen forests are currently still healthy, they face serious challenges.

 

Brent Gardner-Smith/Aspen Journalism

 

As awareness of the potential effects of climate change grows, so does anxiety and grief about the seriousness of the crisis. As a result, a new climate-anxiety support group is forming in Aspen. 

Planning For After The Climate Strikes

Oct 22, 2019
Alex Hager/Aspen Public Radio

More than 4 million people in 163 countries participated in youth-led climate strikes in September. Now what? That’s the question being asked at “Beyond the Strike”, a climate forum being held Wednesday night in Carbondale.

Marching in the streets certainly calls attention to the threat of climate change. Up next, taking action to address the causes of climate change. 

Bureau of Land Management

The Bureau of Land Management’s acting director says past comments he’s made doubting the existence of climate change are irrelevant. 

Reporters grilled William Perry Pendley at the annual Society of Environmental Journalists conference in Fort Collins. When asked about comments he’s made calling human-caused climate change fictional, Pendley refused to elaborate on how he formed those opinions. He instead cited a directive from his boss, Interior Secretary David Bernhardt, to look at climate impacts.

Holy Cross Energy courtesy photo

National Energy Efficiency Day is October 2. Local governments are making progress on their climate goals, but some say there is more to be done.

Aspen, Basalt, Snowmass Village and Pitkin County are working in partnership with the Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) to set and reach goals to reduce carbon-emissions. Aspen’s reduction goal is 30 percent by 2020, Basalt’s is 25 percent by 2025 and Snowmass Village has a 20 percent reduction goal by 2020.

Alex Hager / Aspen Public Radio

Around the world, young people are taking to the streets and demanding action on climate change. On Monday, 16-year-old Greta Thunberg spoke at the United Nations. Even in the Roaring Fork Valley, where many governments and decision-makers have made the climate a priority, young people are saying not enough is being done on a global scale. 

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Journalism

  

The 2019 legislative session in Colorado included a major focus on climate policy, and Gov. Jared Polis has a plan to move the state’s electric grid to 100 percent renewable energy by 2040. 

Will Toor, executive director of the Colorado Energy Office, is in Aspen on Wednesday to discuss that plan and how states can address climate change. 

Courtesy of Mike Molloy

Scientists think the pika, a tiny alpine mammal, may provide clues to what climate change will mean in the Rocky Mountains.

 

Pikas, which are related to rabbits, are particularly sensitive to changes in temperature and snowpack. Researchers with the Front Range Pika Project began collecting data on pikas in the White River National Forest last year. They’re relying on citizen science volunteers to help conduct surveys in several locations across the forest, including Independence Pass. 

Courtesy of Bowman Leigh, Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

 

Project Drawdown is a research organization that identifies the one hundred most viable and impactful solutions to climate change. Founder Paul Hawken was in Aspen last weekend and sat down with reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy.   

Courtesy of Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

 

The Aspen Center for Environmental Studies (ACES) celebrates its 50th anniversary this weekend with a lecture on solution to climate change.

In his 2017 book “Drawdown,” environmentalist Paul Hawken outlines a comprehensive plan to reverse climate change. He’ll discuss the policies and technologies needed to make that happen with ACES CEO Chris Lane tomorrow night. Lane said Hawken brings unparalleled expertise and optimism.

 

At their meeting Tuesday night, the Carbondale Board of Trustees discussed how the town is preparing for a changing climate.

Air Time - Dec. 12, 2018

Dec 12, 2018

  This is Air Time, extended conversations with interesting people.

Courtesy photo

As governments across the world work to address climate change, big businesses are doing the same. David Hone is Chief Climate Change Adviser at the energy company Shell. Hone is in Aspen this week, discussing the company’s plan to limit global temperature rise.

Courtesy photo

Astronomer and educator Dr. Jeffrey Bennett believes we can find consensus on one of the most divisive issues of our time. In a presentation Thursday, he aims to break down political barriers surrounding climate change.

Aspen Skiing Company

Aspen Skiing Company announced Wednesday that it is once again stepping into the political arena with its latest advertising campaign; this season’s marketing focuses on climate change.

Mike Molloy

For nearly a decade, biologists with the nonprofit Rocky Mountain Wild and the Denver Zoo have studied pikas on the Front Range; this summer, that work is expanding to the White River National Forest. Scientists want to know how a warming climate will impact the alpine ecosystem and are hoping pikas can provide some clues.

 

Gina McCarthy Connects Health And Climate

Aug 7, 2018

Gina McCarthy is the director of the Center For Climate, Heath and the Global Environment at Harvard. She was the former administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency under President Obama.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

A panel discussion Tuesday will address what the changing climate means for recreation, agriculture and local economies.

On Friday, an Aspen-based organization awarded $250,000 to 10 groups working on solutions to climate change.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Communities of color and those living in poverty are more likely than others to be exposed to air pollution, toxic waste and water contamination than others in the United States, and studies show the impacts of climate change will also hit these communities harder. Environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy recently spoke with two men who have spent their lives deeply engaged in fighting for civil rights and are now tackling climate activism.

 

Courtesy of Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

In 2016, the world’s largest investment firm issued a report saying that climate change must be a factor in money management. On Wednesday, BlackRock Vice Chairman Philipp Hildebrand will discuss sustainable investing.

Courtesy of Wild Rose Education

A handful of middle and high school students from across the Roaring Fork Valley spent the week learning about climate change and making films.

 

Valley Roundup: Feb. 2, 2018

Feb 2, 2018

Host Alycin Bektesh is joined by Christine Benedetti, editor of Aspen Magazine, Curtis Wackerle, editor of the Aspen Daily News, and Auden Schendler, author of Getting Green Done. His article How to fix the mountain town housing crisis was recently published in Outside Magazine.

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper is joining forces with an organization started by Aspen Mayor Steve Skadron.

Courtesy of Aspen Global Change Institute

Over twenty years ago, Dr. Ben Santer was part of the team of international scientists who first published work showing climate change can be attributed to human influence. He discussed his work with Elizabeth Stewart-Severy.

 

Courtesy of Glynwood Farm

  The way we eat contributes to a warmer world. An author, soil scientist and farmer will discuss “resilient agriculture” in Aspen on Thursday.

Courtesy of instagram.com/govofco

On Tuesday, Colorado became the latest state — and the first in the Rocky Mountain region — to commit to fighting climate change.

Courtesy of nps.gov

As scientists work to understand and address a changing climate, some are exploring creative and unusual approaches. Environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy sat in on a discussion about “climate moonshots” at last week’s Aspen Ideas Festival. She talked with producer Christin Kay about why some scientists want to resurrect wooly mammoths.

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