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DACA

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Thirty-two-year-old New Castle resident Janeth Niebla said she cried tears of joy Thursday morning when she read that the U.S. Supreme Court ruled against the Trump administration in upholding the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program.

“Along with all of my friends who were just patiently waiting to see what decision we were going to get, I feel just really excited, really grateful, really blessed,” she said. 

The U.S. Supreme Court issued a decision Thursday that extends the life of DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. The ruling was a big surprise to many, including DACA recipients who worried they might soon face deportation.

"I couldn't believe it," Emma Chalott Barron, a DACA recipient who will be starting law school at the University of North Texas in the fall, told NPR member station KERA in Dallas.

ALEX HAGER / ASPEN PUBLIC RADIO

 

 

The U.S. Supreme Court is expected to decide whether the Trump administration has the authority to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program any week now. This could have a huge impact on DACA recipients in the Roaring Fork Valley.

 

Alex Hager / Aspen Public Radio

 

Tuesday night, dozens of demonstrators gathered outside of Glenwood Springs High School to show their support for those protected by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, also known as DACA. The Obama-era program covers immigrants who were brought into the United States when their parents entered illegally.

Alex Hager / Aspen Public Radio

 

 

Colorado Mountain College joined 165 other colleges and universities across the country in signing a letter of support for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. 

DACA applies to people who were brought in to the United States as children or babies when their parents entered illegally. The program gives them protection from deportation and the ability to work and study in the U.S. legally.

 

Attorney Claire Noone Returns From Border

Dec 14, 2018

Glenwood attorney Claire Noone recently traveled to the U.S.-Mexico border to advise immigrants who are making asylum claims.

Marchers Rally Against Family Separation

Jul 19, 2018

  

More than 50 people gathered in Paepke Park last night to protest the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s practice of separating families accused of crossing the border illegally.

Alpine Bank has awarded scholarships to 13 graduating high school seniors, headed to Colorado Mountain College in the fall.

CMC stands for immigration reform, for DREAMers

Jan 16, 2018
Aspen Public Radio

Last Friday, the board of Colorado Mountain College (CMC) unanimously passed a resolution in support of their DREAMer students who, the resolution states, deserve a pathway to citizenship.

Colorado Mountain College

Colorado Mountain College (CMC) is considering adopting a resolution in support of immigration reform. If all seven of the college's trustees sign on, it'll be official.

Wyatt Orme

Colorado’s Sens. Democrat Michael Bennet and Republican Cory Gardner co-sponsored the DREAM Act of 2017. It would grant residency to immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children, otherwise known as “Dreamers.”

DREAMers to Rep. Tipton: Now is the time to act

Dec 4, 2017
Colorado Immigrants Rights Coalition

Local immigrant rights activists are holding a rally at Glenwood Springs High School on Tuesday. They want Rep. Scott Tipton, a Republican, to commit to the undocumented people who were brought to the U.S. as children, otherwise known as DREAMers.

Four years ago state lawmakers – and the governor – created a law to help undocumented children follow their American dreams. They allowed them to pay the significantly cheaper in-state tuition to go to state colleges instead of higher out-of-state prices. The requirements: They must graduate from a Colorado high school that they’ve attended for three years and promise to pursue citizenship.

“This is an issue that has been a challenge in our state and our country for many years,” said Speaker of the House Crisanta Duran, one of the main sponsors of Senate Bill 33.

Valley Roundup for Sept. 29, 2017

Sep 29, 2017

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I'm Carolyn Sackariason. The Latino community makes up a sizable portion of the population in the Roaring Fork Valley. Earlier this week, the Glenwood Post Independent held the third of what’s dubbed the “Common Ground” forums. The topics was immigration.

In the wake of several high-profile decisions on immigration by President Trump, residents packed a room at the Glenwood Springs Library on Tuesday night to hear local leaders debate the issue.

Valley Roundup for Sept. 22, 2017

Sep 22, 2017

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

Joining me this week are Randy Essex, editor and publisher of the Glenwood Post Independent, David Krause, editor of The Aspen Times, and Madeleine Osberger, contributing editor of the Aspen Daily News.

 

 

Valley Roundup, Sept. 15, 2017

Sep 15, 2017

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

 

Joining me on Valley Roundup this week are Aspen Daily News columnist Mick Ireland and editor Curtis Wackerle, along with Randy Essex, editor and publisher of the Glenwood Post Independent.

Aspen Public Radio

On Sept. 5, the Trump administration announced its plans to phase out DACA, or “Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals,” which is the Obama-era policy allowing children, who came to the U.S. illegally, to remain.

Colorado is joining a lawsuit trying to block President Trump from ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA).

Aspen Public Radio

 A crowd of several dozen gathered Tuesday night at the Glenwood Springs Colorado Mountain College (CMC) campus to protest the Trump administration’s decision to end DACA — the law giving temporary protection to so-called “dreamers.”

Roaring Fork Valley "Dreamers" Renew DACA Status

Nov 3, 2014
Marci Krivonen

More than half a million immigrants nationwide took advantage of the policy that protects against deportation and offers a work permit for those who qualify. These young people applied for the federal Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, two years ago. Now they are renewing. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports it’s estimated hundreds of people in the Roaring Fork Valley applied.

I meet Cristina Pena in the Walmart parking lot in Glenwood Springs. The 24-year-old is still wearing her uniform. She just finished her shift as a cashier.