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Immigration

When it comes to immigration, Americans have a lot of misconceptions about immigrants.  That’s one of the findings from a new national survey released Thursday from Public Agenda, USA Today and Ipsos Hidden Common Ground.

The U.S. Supreme Court issued a decision Thursday that extends the life of DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. The ruling was a big surprise to many, including DACA recipients who worried they might soon face deportation.

"I couldn't believe it," Emma Chalott Barron, a DACA recipient who will be starting law school at the University of North Texas in the fall, told NPR member station KERA in Dallas.

Courtesy of the National Immigration Forum

Ali Noorani is a guest speaker at English in Action's annual fundraiser (June 18, 6 p.m.), which is being held virtually this year due to COVID-19.

Noorani is executive director of the National Immigrant Forum and author of the book “There Goes The Neighborhood: How Communities Overcome Prejudice And Meet The Challenge of Immigration.” On his podcast, “Only in America,” he interviews people across the political and ideological spectrum about key issues surrounding the immigration debate.

ALEX HAGER / ASPEN PUBLIC RADIO

 

 

The U.S. Supreme Court is expected to decide whether the Trump administration has the authority to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program any week now. This could have a huge impact on DACA recipients in the Roaring Fork Valley.

 

Creative Commons

  

Roaring Fork Valley non-profit MANAUS is giving financial support to immigrant families to help them make it through the COVID-19 pandemic. As of Friday, the organization had ensured $1,000 to 377 immigrant families in the Valley.

Alex Hager / Aspen Public Radio

 

Tuesday night, dozens of demonstrators gathered outside of Glenwood Springs High School to show their support for those protected by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, also known as DACA. The Obama-era program covers immigrants who were brought into the United States when their parents entered illegally.

Courtesy Mountain Family Health

Earlier this month, a controversial immigration rule from the Trump administration was put on hold by federal judges in five different states. Although the new regulation has not yet been put into law, it is still having an impact in the Roaring Fork Valley.

President Trump is unveiling an immigration plan that would vastly change who's allowed into the United States. The administration's proposal focuses on reducing family-based immigration to the U.S. in favor of employment skill-based immigration. Watch his remarks from the White House Rose Garden live at 12:30 PM MT.

If it is after 12:30 PM MT and the video will not start, try reloading the page.

This is Air Time, extended conversations with interesting people.

Valley Round Up -Sept. 7, 2018

Sep 9, 2018

This week: The City of Aspen will build new offices, it’s up to the public to decide where, a look into life in the valley for the many undocumented workers, and the allure of the solo hike, even though we all know it’s dangerous.  

Alpine Bank has awarded scholarships to 13 graduating high school seniors, headed to Colorado Mountain College in the fall.

Roaring Fork Pre Collegiate's mission is to provide academic and extracurricular support to motivated middle and high school students who would be the first generation in their families to graduate from college. The recent and overwhelming immigration concerns impact many Pre Collegiate participants. David Smith, Executive Director, Jim Light, current Mentor and member of Pre Collegiate's advisory board, and Aranza Lopez, Basalt High School Senior and Pre Collegiate participant speak on the impact Roaring Fork Pre Collegiate has on these students. 

Roni Morales explains how Mountain Family Health Centers plays a role in the recent immigration concerns in our valley. Garry Schalla highlights the non-profits team-based system. 

This week, a local immigration rights activist took sanctuary in a Carbondale church. There’s a freeze on some land-use applications in the mid-valley, and a long-debated Aspen project is sneaking back into the picture. The doors are still closed at Justice Snow's, an Aspen restaurant, while city council discusses its fate. And Coloradans are expecting to pay much more for health care next year.

 

In the wake of several high-profile decisions on immigration by President Trump, residents packed a room at the Glenwood Springs Library on Tuesday night to hear local leaders debate the issue.

Valley Roundup for Morning Edition, Aug. 11, 2017

Aug 10, 2017

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

 

Joining me this week are Madeleine Osberger, contributing editor of the Aspen Daily News. I’m Carolyn Sackariason and you are listening to Valley Roundup, an analysis and commentary of the week’s news with writers and editors. We continue our conversation with Jason Auslander, reporter for the Aspen Times, Randy Essex, editor and publisher of the Glenwood Springs Post Independent and Lorenzo Semple, columnist for the Aspen Daily News.

 

 

ICE surge reaches Roaring Fork Valley

Jul 26, 2017

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is the federal agency in charge of enforcing immigration law. It’s been active in the Roaring Fork Valley over the past several days.

This week on Audio Canvas, Sarah Thornton discusses a panel she will lead called Sisters on Top: Art-world professionals talk about Islam, Immigration and Ingenuity. The panel features Diana Al-Hadid, Hume Bhabha, and Leila Heller.   

Colorado Attorney General Cynthia Coffman is working to reach immigrant populations targeted in extortion scams.

Pitkin County officials are still scratching their heads about why the federal government has threatened one of their funding sources.

Pitkin County Sheriff, Joe DiSalvo, was recently contacted by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE. He learned the county is on a list with five others in Colorado who allegedly are going to lose federal funding.

Aspen Public Radio

On Monday, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions narrowed the definition of “sanctuary jurisdictions.” They are now places that “willfully refuse to comply” with federal immigration law. Pitkin County is one of them.

Valley Roundup, April 7, 2017

Apr 7, 2017

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

Residents in Glenwood Springs have elected a new city council. And with the new majority, expect changes afoot, especially as the issues on both ends of the valley become more connected.

The Basalt Town Council is expected to vote on a resolution to become a “safe harbor” for immigrants.

Aspen Public Radio News

This past week, immigration authorities arrested hundreds of undocumented people across the country. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) said this is nothing out of the ordinary.

In a recent executive order, President Donald Trump took aim at “sanctuary cities.” These are places that, supposedly, don’t comply with federal immigration authorities.

Jennifer Smith is an immigration attorney in Glenwood Springs. For more than a decade, she’s helped immigrants from all around the world navigate the complexities of immigration law.

Three Aspenites become Americans

Mar 16, 2016

Three Aspen residents became U.S. citizens this week after taking the Oath of Allegiance at the federal courthouse in Grand Junction. Aspen Public Radio’s Barbara Platts has the story.

Scam targets undocumented Coloradans

Jan 7, 2016

The Attorney General’s Office announced Thursday that it has opened an investigation into the practice of scammers booking all of the available appointments at the Department of Motor Vehicles that taxpaying immigrants need to get a state ID.

In the 1980's, an increasing number of immigrants - predominantly from Mexico and Central America - became a vital part of the Roaring Fork Valley. Some of these new immigrants struggled to learn English and in some cases, cultural divides developed.

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