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Pitkin County Health and Human Services

 A tax that provides funding for 70 public health nonprofits in the valley expires this year. Ballot measure 1A asks Pitkin County voters to keep it alive.

Valley Roundup for Sept. 22, 2017

Sep 22, 2017

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

Joining me this week are Randy Essex, editor and publisher of the Glenwood Post Independent, David Krause, editor of The Aspen Times, and Madeleine Osberger, contributing editor of the Aspen Daily News.

 

 

Courtesy of Pitkin County

Pitkin County public health officials are cautioning residents about an increase in bat activity after 11 of them were recently found dead along a trail in Snowmass Village.

courtesy photo

 Pitkin County officials are leading a two-day charge this week to address mental health services throughout the Roaring Fork Valley.

courtesy photo

Next week, key players providing public health in the valley are convening to address funding for mental health services.

 Pitkin County Health and Human services director Nan Sundeen has been in her position for 25 years.

Aspen police chief hiring a 'human services officer'

Dec 15, 2016

As Aspen police officers increasingly respond to calls related to drugs and alcohol, homelessness and other mental health related issues, a new kind of policing has emerged. Elected officials recently signed off on a one hundred thousand dollar experiment to see if dedicating one highly trained officer helps in the field. Carolyn Sackariason spoke with Aspen Police Chief Richard Pryor about the new — and unprecedented — position he’s creating.  

The Mobile Food Pantry plans to stop serving

Jul 11, 2016
Photo Courtesy of Ryer Gardenswartz

  A local food pantry program is about to stop serving people in the Roaring Fork Valley after six years.

 

Aaron Rogers / courtesy photo

As visitors dole out thousands of dollars in Aspen this weekend to experience the creme de la creme of food and beverage, there are people in the valley who work to stretch $20 for an entire week of food.

LIFT-UP gets big boost to open larger Aspen food pantry

Nov 17, 2015

  A local nonprofit will receive a more than $28,000 increase to its county funding in order to serve families in need in the Aspen area. Morgan Neely has the details.  

 

With seven area food pantries, LIFT-UP, based in Rifle, provides meals for thousands of valley residents every year. And now, with the help of Pitkin County’s Healthy Community Fund, Lift-up’s upgraded Aspen center will be able to provide more food, and a better variety of food, to families and individuals in need of temporary assistance.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Paul Downey

The Great Recession may be in the rearview mirror, but it left poverty in its wake. Pitkin County’s Health and Human Services Department reports more people living in poverty. Director of the Department Nan Sundeen says a quarter of residents earn slightly more than federal poverty wages. So, many single adults are making just $23,000 a year. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

Nan Sundeen is director of Pitkin County Health and Human Services. Next week, we’ll examine access to health care for the poor.

Creative Commons/Flickr/madeleinehearn

The Pitkin County Commissioners aired several concerns about a plan to make the Aspen Valley Hospital and Pitkin County Health and Human Services campus smoke and tobacco free. 

The policy would apply to outdoor areas around the sprawling campus off Castle Creek Road. Besides the hospital and county building, the ban would apply to Whitcomb Terrace, hospital employee housing and Senior Services. Right now, most areas allow smoking 15 feet from a door.

Your Morning News - February 3rd, 2015

Feb 3, 2015

Aspen Talks Health & Human Services Funding

Aspen City Council continued a conversation last night about funding health and human service organizations. Right now, the City doles out $400,000 annually to various charities.

The council’s conversation centered around whether additional dollars should be pulled from another pot of money and if the method currently used for choosing worthy organizations should continue. Right now Pitkin County decides where the money goes.

Mayor Steve Skadron suggested pulling additional dollars from a tax dedicated to the Wheeler Opera House.

“This is how I think it should go: should new incremental money come into our pool of contributions, I believe that money should have a focused outcome. I think the focus should be on uniquely Aspen problems.”

He’d like to support seniors in need, substance abuse, mental health and suicide. The conversation will continue later this month, when councilman Dwayne Romero is present.

Valley View Hospital Reports Possible Virus Cases

Sep 11, 2014
Christopher Mullen/Glenwood Springs Post Independent

   Valley View Hospital issued a statement Thursday afternoon saying doctors are treating a number of patients with symptoms similar to a virus making the rounds in Denver.  Valley View Executive Director Stacey Gavrell released the statement, which says, quote: “While a number of patients have had respiratory symptoms that could be the EV-D68, they have not been confirmed.”

Number of Virus Cases in Garfield County Unclear

Sep 11, 2014
Centers for Disease Control

Health officials in the Roaring Fork Valley say they’re not worried about a severe respiratory illness making the rounds in Denver and other states. Doctors in Denver have treated thousands of patients, some of them confirmed cases of a rare virus called Enterovirus D68 (or EV-D68). 

As of Wednesday afternoon, representatives of Eagle and Pitkin counties said they were not aware of any cases.  Garfield County reported one case, but then said there wasn't enough information from Valley View Hospital to confirm. Requests to Valley View on Thursday were unanswered.

Marci Krivonen

The bulk of federal health care reform is starting to roll out and big changes could be in store for Colorado’s rural areas. Many of these regions, including the Roaring Fork Valley, are full of people who are uninsured. A quarter of residents living in the mountain counties of Eagle, Pitkin, Garfield, Grand and Summit don’t have health insurance. With the Affordable Care Act, this group will be required to have insurance, or pay a penalty. But, it’s likely not everyone will apply. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.