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Across the nation, Black babies have some of the highest rates of infant mortalities and birth outcomes such as low birthweight, according to a new report by nonprofit Zero to Three.

 


Gov. Jared Polis on Friday signed a set of police reforms into law, saying they were a "long overdue moment of national reflection."

The bipartisan law is Colorado's response to protests sparked by the death of George Floyd and other unarmed Black people who have been killed by law enforcement.

Alex Hagar / Aspen Public Radio

An English-language version of this story can be found here.

Las protestas en contra el racismo y la brutalidad policial aumentaron a cientos de personas en Aspen el fin de semana pasado. Se planean más manifestaciones para el sábado y el domingo por la mañana en el parque Wagner.

As demonstrators gathered around the White House last weekend, Howard University law student Tope Aladetimi leaned her cardboard protest sign against the street median and took a load off her feet. She had already been out protesting for a few hours, and the temperature was climbing into the 90s.

"There's a power in using your body, and actually physically being here," Aladetimi said. "Oftentimes, our voices aren't heard and this is the only way we're able to get our message across."

Domonique Dille, a Howard law school classmate, feels an urgency to this moment.

At a hearing last weekend about a Colorado bill on vaccination, Dr. Reginald Washington had originally planned to make several urgent points in support of the bill. 

First, that diseases like measles are resurging, and they’re serious. (He’d know. He’s treated patients with complications from measles and pertussis.) Second, due to COVID-19, children are missing well-child visits and skipping vaccinations, putting them at risk of outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases. 

Alex Hager / Aspen Public Radio

Pueden encontrar la versión en español aqui  

Protests against racism and police brutality swelled to hundreds of people in Aspen last weekend. More demonstrations are planned for Saturday and Sunday morning at Wagner Park. 

Roaring Fork Valley residents Jenelle Figgins and Sajari Simmons co-founded the new advocacy group Roaring Fork Show Up and have organized the protests. 

Last week, Republican Sen. John Cooke of Greeley said he was calling a sweeping set of police reforms being proposed by Democratic lawmakers the “I hate the police bill.”

But on Tuesday, the former sheriff of Weld County had dramatically changed his mind. He said the measure — which will require officers to wear body cameras, intervene when their peers are using inappropriate force and follow several other new rules aimed at stopping police brutality — should now be embraced by all law enforcement agencies.

John Bennett

This weekend, protesters gathered throughout the Roaring Fork Valley to call attention to systematic racism and police violence in the wake of George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis. 

Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, died on Memorial Day after police officer Derek Chauvin, who is white, pinned him to the ground and kept his knee on Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes. 

In Aspen on Saturday, hundreds of local protesters marched through the rainy streets in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement.

As large protests against police brutality continue around the nation, Democratic lawmakers at the state Capitol are advancing a bill they say will help prevent deadly police encounters in Colorado.