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Recycling

Creativity103 via Creative Commons

A recycling dropoff center in Basalt shut down on Friday after Pitkin County pulled funding, and Basalt and Eagle County couldn’t pay new higher rates to keep it open. Now, the town and Eagle County will host a pair of events where people can bring hard-to-dispose of items, such as large electronics, paint, motor oil, tires and yard waste. 

 

via Google Earth


Last week, private garbage and recycling company Waste Management said it would cost $120,000 to operate a public recycling drop-off center in Basalt next year, more than double what it cost in 2019. The firm says that comes in response to higher drop-off fees at a larger facility in Denver.

 

Creativity103 via Creative Commons

A recycling center in Basalt is set to close at the start of 2020 after Pitkin County decided to stop funding it, and residents are now turning to Eagle County in hopes of a solution.

City of Aspen

Aspen is taking over the Rio Grande Recycle Center from Pitkin County in August.

A recent survey suggests overwhelmingly Aspenites want it to stay open. What services it’ll provide and what that will cost is uncertain.

City council will discuss the results Monday.

 

 

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Pitkin County is working to update its rules about hauling trash and recyclables, and a proposed ordinance aims to expand recycling in a challenging market.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Colorado’s top recycling experts are gathering in Snowmass Village this week to discuss solutions for Colorado’s recycling challenges.

Alycin Bektesh / Aspen Public Radio

The current Solid Waste Hauler Ordinance was last updated in 1991. County staff says trends in waste disposal and management have changed significantly in the decades since.

Barbara Platts/Aspen Public Radio

At a meeting Tuesday, Pitkin County Commissioner Greg Poschman said he’d like to see real efforts to eliminate plastic.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

January marked a new era in recycling: China stopped accepting certain types of paper and plastics from abroad. This means companies like Roaring Fork Valley collector Waste Management have had to find new buyers. And they’ve had to adapt in other ways, too. In the second story in a series, we explore what this means for the industry — and what role consumers play.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Before the first of the year, most of the recycling collected in the Roaring Fork Valley—and across the country—ultimately found its way to China. But China is no longer accepting items like paper and plastic from abroad. So what happens to your empty cans, bottles and boxes after you toss them in the bin?

Carolyn Sackariason/Aspen Public Radio News

Christmas trees that have passed their prime may see another life at area landfills.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

This holiday season, while trash cans across America overflow with packaging, wrapping paper and discarded gifts, the Pitkin County Landfill faces an even bigger issue: the by-products of luxury building.

Courtesy of Pitkin County Landfill

Thrift store rejects may yet see another life. The Pitkin County landfill has started a textile recycling program.

 

Elise Thatcher

The vast majority of recyclable materials from the Roaring Fork Valley are being shipped across the Pacific Ocean.

Glenwood voters allow officials to consider land sale

Sep 8, 2015
Elise Thatcher

  Voters have chosen to allow Glenwood Springs officials to consider selling property to the Roaring Fork School District. That’s the result of an election that ended Tuesday. The City of Glenwood Springs can now choose to sell property to the Roaring Fork School District.

Basalt to fund recycling drop off for September

Aug 12, 2015
Elise Thatcher

The Town of Basalt has stepped up to temporarily fund a popular recycling center. Waste Management runs the site now, but says the estimated operating cost is unsustainable without outside funding. The company met with Pitkin County and Basalt officials this week, on Monday August 10th.

Valley Roundup 7-13-15

Jul 31, 2015

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason

Joining me this week are Curtis Wackerle, editor of the Aspen Daily News, Randy Essex, editor of the Glenwood Post Independent, Andy Stone, columnist and former editor of the Aspen Times and Michael Miracle, editor of Aspen Sojourner magazine.

Aspen residents continue to take their town back by slowing growth and development in their own grassroots way. It’s anyone’s guess how elected officials will respond.

Waste Management begins talks with Basalt

Jul 14, 2015
Elise Thatcher

It’s a cloudy summer day, and man named Paul is dropping off some cans and glass bottles at Basalt’s recycling site. He declines to give his last name, but shares a few thoughts about the drop off site. Like, “stay open later so the working man can get here.”

Marci Krivonen

A study is underway in the upper valley (Aspen/Pitkin County) to see what people are tossing in the trash. It’s a dirty job, but the goal is to find ways to get more people to recycle and extend the life of the Pitkin County landfill. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

A front loader dumps bags of trash onto a tarp at the Pitkin County landfill. It’s garbage from households and businesses from Carbondale to Aspen.

Nearby a group of ten workers in white safety suits is picking through the trash.

Marci Krivonen

In Aspen this week, well-known brands like Helly Hansen and Columbia are being featured on the runway during Aspen International Fashion Week. Farther Downvalley, a different kind of fashion show is about to get underway. The so-called Green is the New Black show highlights recycled and sustainable clothing. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explains.