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Ideas, Speakers & Lectures

Aspen Public Radio is proud to present select leactures and speakers from area events and conferences such as the Aspen Ideas Festival, Aspen Institute McCloskey Speaker Series, and more.

Many experts argue that massive government mobilization on the scale of World War II deployment is needed to address the catastrophe of climate change. Such is the scope of the Green New Deal, a policy calling for 100 percent renewable energy by 2030, universal health care, living wages, and jobs guarantees.

Aspen Ideas Festival

Join two of the country’s most prominent rural voices — the authors of acclaimed but thoroughly different memoirs of growing up in rural American communities. They’ll address the similarities and differences between the experiences and their resulting outlooks, what they think urban Americans get wrong about our rural people and places, and how they are using their platforms to address some of the most complex challenges that rural communities face today.  

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In resort communities, the pressure to be, or, at least appear, happy can make some people less likely to talk about feeling depressed or lonely.  Therapist and author Lori Gottlieb encourages people to be honest about the fact that life’s not perfect.

Her new book “Maybe You Should Talk To Someone” details her experiences working with four of her patients.

aspenideas.org

The Aspen Ideas Health conference has a new series of discussions that focus on local issues.

It kicks off with a look at the Roaring Fork Valley’s affordable housing crisis and its potential impacts on residents’ health.  

 

The other two discussions will explore the emotional toll of climate change and how to support the mental health of first responders.

 

Ryer Gardenswartz / Aspen Public Radio News

Acoustics, intimacy, clarity: One could argue that how and where we listen to music is as important to the experience as the music itself. “The orchestra has to feel the audience, the audience has to feel the orchestra,” said architect Frank Gehry on his design of the Pierre Boulez Saal in Berlin, which opened in 2017. “When they do that, the orchestra plays better, and the audience hears better.” What is it about design that brings music to life?  

  

Aspen Ideas Festival

The spring of 2013 marked the 15th anniversary of the US invasion of Iraq, and the war in Afghanistan has gone on long enough that children born after 9/11 are now old enough to enlist in the military. Is there any path out of conflict for Iraq and Afghanistan — for the United States, or for the citizens of the war-weary countries?

Aspen Ideas Festival

   Atlanta-based defense attorney and #BillionDollarLawyer Drew Findling shares the stage with his client, international hip-hop star Kiari Cephus — known onstage as Offset, one third of the music trio Migos — to discuss the intersection of criminal justice, race, and hip-hop. These issues, common themes in hip-hop music, reflect deeply rooted societal schisms which play out endlessly in the collateral consequences of criminal conviction and mass incarceration.  

For its annual, signature event in the Benedict Music Tent, the 2018 Aspen Ideas Festival hosts former secretary of state John Kerry in a candid conversation about geopolitics with Andrea Mitchell.

Aspen Institute

The Founders created a representative republic rather than a direct democracy, designed to slow down deliberation so that majorities could rule based on reason rather than passion. But in the age of Facebook and Twitter, new social media technologies have unleashed populist passions and accelerated public discourse to warp speed, creating the very mobs, demagogues, echo chambers, and factions that Madison and Hamilton feared. Is the American idea in crisis, and if so, what can we do about it?

In the US marketplace, 11.6 million businesses are owned by women. Growth in this sector has increased by 114 percent since 1997 — 2.5 times the national average — but male-led firms are still more likely to get start-up funding. That’s not simply unfair, it’s stupid, because it turns out firms started by women regularly outperform those founded by men.

Aspen Ideas Festival

Charlottesville, the iconic home of Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe, and the University of Virginia, is now also permanently associated with the 2017 white supremacist hate rallies — and their tragic outcome. Why did those groups choose Charlottesville? What was the impact of the violence on the community, and how has the city worked to move forward? What has Charlottesville learned, and what can it teach America about healing and resilience in a time of resurging hate and divisiveness?

 

Despite repeated attempts, Congress has not repealed the Affordable Care Act, although the Trump Administration has chipped away at some of its provisions. The requirement that all insurance plans offer “ten essential benefits” has been softened and the individual mandate to carry a minimum level of coverage has been repealed.

The states shoulder a significant amount of responsibility for tackling the opioid epidemic, reversing obesity trends, and reducing tobacco use within their borders. They also have policy decisions to make about expanding Medicaid, developing health exchanges under the Affordable Care Act, serving undocumented residents, and strengthening their public health systems.

More than 2,000 children have been separated from their parents at the Mexico-U.S. border in recent weeks. Housed in tent camps, converted warehouses, and other shelters, they have had no idea when they will see their parents again. The Trump Administration may end the enforced separation by indefinitely detaining families together, but that is unlikely to eliminate enduring health impacts.

Christin Kay / Aspen Public Radio

The Aspen Ideas Festival starts Thursday, and there is new art on the campus of the Aspen Institute. Slogans like “End the draft!” and “Vote yes for peace!” are stamped in giant letters on Vietnam-era protest posters in the Paepcke Gallery.

Aspen Public Radio

On Monday, July 10, the inaugural Sandra Day O’Connor Conversation featured Associate Justice Elena Kagan of the U.S. Supreme Court. 

Aspen Institute

Damian Woetzel’s tenure as director of the Aspen Institute Arts Program is slowly coming to a close. He was named president of the Juilliard School in May. Arts reporter Claire Woodcock caught up with Woetzel during the 2017 Aspen Ideas Festival to talk about his overarching mission with both institutions.

2017 Ideas swag bag gives back

Jul 3, 2017
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The Aspen Ideas Festival swag bag has been designed by top names in fashion, Tory Burch, Ralph Lauren and Lauren Bush Lauren.

Jon Lovett is a former speech writer for Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. He’s a co-founder of Crooked Media, a left-leaning media company bent on inspiring grassroots political action.

NPR

The Trump Administration says it is “committed to a foreign policy focused on American interests and American national security” and that “the world will be more peaceful and more prosperous with a stronger and more respected America.” Others have called Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris agreement, waffling commitment to NATO, and abandonment of the TPP dangerous acts of isolationism that will create a vacuum of American leadership, and openings for others to reorder the world.

In recent years, the founding fathers have almost become deities—figures to be revered for their role in creating our nation. But do they deserve being ascribed these God-like qualities? After all, many of them were slave owners, had personal lives filled with scandal, and had feuds that impaired their focus on the country. And, almost all of them had serious reservations about democracy and the viability of country they were creating.

Walter Isaacson is fascinated by innovators — the kinds of geniuses whose ideas have transformed industry, science, and society. Albert Einstein, Steve Jobs, and Benjamin Franklin each grabbed his attention in ways that allow us, as readers, to discover the depth and breadth of their brilliant thinking and creative sensibilities.

Aspen Institute

Latino evangelicals — a fast-growing population that is nearing 20 percent of American Latinos, and rising — exemplify the difficult positions many Christians find themselves in today, where social conservatism and deep Christian faith run headlong into hard questions about immigrants, refugees, the poor, and moral leadership. 

Valley Roundup, June 30, 2017

Jul 1, 2017

 

The annual Aspen Institute Ideas Festival made local and national headlines all week, and there's plenty going on in the communities of Carbondale and Glenwood Springs. Speaking with News Director Carolyn Sackariason on Valley Roundup this week are Carla Jean Whitley, an editor for the Glenwood Post Independent via Skype, and Aspen Daily News Editor Curtis Wackerle and Aspen Times Managing Editor Rick Carroll in the studio.

 

 

 

Aspen Public Radio's Lawn Party with Joshua Johnson

Jul 1, 2017
Ross Kribbs

Aspen Public Radio was proud to present our second annual Lawn Party on June 29. The event featured Joshua Johnson of 1A.

A big thanks to our sponsors for making this event a success. Sponsors included Alpine Bank, Red Brick Center for the Arts, King & Cook, which provided amazing barbecue, and Aspen Brewing Co., Suerte Tequia and Stripped Mixers, which provided libations.

Aspen Ideas Festival: Afternoon of Conversation

Jul 1, 2017

  The Aspen Ideas Festival's signature event hosts an audience of 2,000 in the Benedict Music Tent. Big thinkers and doers will engage serious ideas about their work, our world, and the future.

Aspen Institute

Work, play, privacy, communication, finance, war, and dating: algorithms and the machines that run them have upended them all. Will artificial intelligence become as ubiquitous as electricity? Is there any industry AI won't touch?

Hate groups and hate-fueled incidents are spiking in America. The Southern Poverty Law Center, through aggregating media reports and gathered submissions from its website, recently catalogued 1051 acts of intimidation and hate in the first month after Trump won the presidency. What is the evidence of this rising tide, and what does it look like in our communities? What groups are most frequently targeted today? What theories might explain this rise, and what can Americans who value tolerance do to fight back?

Matt Ferro

The kind of work we do — and the way we do it — has changed a lot over the past 50 years. The modern-day employee is fast, flexible, and mobile. More and more, companies are finding they must enhance their physical environment in order to create the kind of cultural environment that attracts next-generation talent and gives them a competitive edge. 

Valley Roundup for Morning Edition, June 30, 2017

Jun 30, 2017

 The annual Aspen Institute Ideas Festival is in its ninth day and has been making local and national headlines all week. Speaking with News Director Carolyn Sackariason on Valley Roundup this morning are Aspen Daily News editor Curtis Wackerle and Aspen Times managing editor Rick Carroll.

 

 

 

 

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