KAJX

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy

Environment Reporter

Aspen native Elizabeth Stewart-Severy is excited to be back at the Red Brick, where she attended kindergarten, to report on all things environmental. She has spent her entire life playing in the mountains and rivers around Aspen. She attended the University of Colorado with a Boettcher Scholarship and graduated as the top student from the School of Journalism in 2006. Her lifelong love of hockey lead to a stint working for the Colorado Avalanche, and she still plays in local leagues and coaches the Aspen Junior Hockey U-19 girls.

Elizabeth received a Master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Colorado, and she returned home to teach journalism and English at her alma mater, Aspen High School, in 2009. As a teacher, she helped young people better understand their world and tell stories that matter. Under Elizabeth’s leadership, the AHS student newspaper, the Skier Scribbler, has expanded to win local, state and national awards and now also hosts a multimedia website.

Elizabeth is excited to combine her passions for understanding the natural environment and telling important stories; if you find her toppled off her mountain bike somewhere, please give her a hand.  

Ways to Connect

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Pitkin County has committed to using science to protect wildlife and habitat on the 5,000 acres of open space property it owns, and last week, the Open Space and Trails Board recommended spending more than $200,000 studying area wildlife.

 

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Up high in the Collegiate Peaks Wilderness, there’s an abandoned metal snow fence — well, there used to be. A diverse group of volunteers joined a team of mules and horses to haul tons of rebar out of the backcountry last month. Pack strings are one of the few ways to get heavy work done in protected wilderness areas, but their future is uncertain.

www.aspenfire.org

The Aspen Fire Protection District is asking voters to approve an increase in property taxes that would fund firefighter housing, capital improvements and more.

Courtesy of U.S. Forest Service

Hundreds of thousands of people visited Hanging Lake last year, and the U.S. Forest Service says too much traffic has caused damage to the sensitive ecosystem. On Friday, the agency released its final decision to require hikers to get permits to visit the popular spot.

Courtesy photo

Astronomer and educator Dr. Jeffrey Bennett believes we can find consensus on one of the most divisive issues of our time. In a presentation Thursday, he aims to break down political barriers surrounding climate change.

Courtesy of Natural Resources Conservation Service

A winter with low snowpack and a dry, hot summer combined to create the second-worst water year on record for Colorado.

Courtesy of Christy Rose

Only one river in Colorado is designated Wild and Scenic, the nation’s highest protection for rivers. The Wild and Scenic Rivers Act, which ensures that designated rivers remain free-flowing, celebrates 50 years today.

 

The Lake Christine Fire tested how prepared Eagle County is for natural disasters, and now the county is updating its hazard mitigation plan.

Courtesy of Christy Rose

A small wildfire broke out Thursday in the Holland Hills area near Basalt. Officials believe it started because of an electrical issue.

Courtesy photo

National Geographic science writer Gary Ferguson has documented how wildfires are getting bigger, hotter and more dangerous. The author of “Land on Fire” is in the Roaring Fork Valley this week discussing the role of climate change in shifting fire behavior and sharing insights about how communities can respond and prepare.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

The Colorado State Forest Service is looking to help local governments, homeowners’ associations and utilities reduce wildfire risks.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Roaring Fork Valley native Pete McBride is a photojournalist whose latest work “The Grand Canyon: Between River and Rim” is being released Wednesday. It chronicles his 800-mile hike through the entire canyon and highlights developments that threaten to change the landscape.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Local and national wildfire experts are gathering in the Roaring Fork Valley this week for a series of panel discussions.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Tuesday, Aspen City Council will hear an update on the city’s progress on reducing its carbon footprint. The focus is on curtailing the demand for fossil fuels.

Holy Cross Energy courtesy photo

Holy Cross Energy announced Wednesday it will nearly double its renewable energy resources and cut greenhouse gas emissions in the next decade.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Filoha Meadows Nature Preserve is tucked between steep mountain cliffs and the Crystal River; the open space is a flat expanse of wetlands. On a recent brisk fall morning, plant ecologists Rea Orthner and Denise Wilson lead the way across the swampy meadow. We’re here because of the stream orchid, which blooms in penny-sized flowers in mid-summer.

Aspen Public Radio

While most local rivers are flowing at levels far below average, the Fryingpan is the exception. Releases from Ruedi Reservoir are supplementing low flows downstream, in the Colorado River.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Pitkin County is working to update its rules about hauling trash and recyclables, and a proposed ordinance aims to expand recycling in a challenging market.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Officials with Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) announced that the Basalt shooting range will reopen Saturday. It’s been closed for more than two months after the Lake Christine Fire ignited there, and there will be some changes at the range.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Developers in Pitkin County have not yet embraced renewable energy as the go-to source.

 

Pages