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Environment News

The environment desk at Aspen Public Radio covers all things environment in the Roaring Fork Valley and throughout the state of Colorado. Issues include, but are not limited to, water use and quality, impact of recreation, population growth and oil and gas development.  APR’s environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy heads the desk.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Eight wildfires now burn in Colorado, and Roaring Fork Valley communities are under fire restrictions because of hot, dry, windy conditions.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Stage one fire restrictions went into effect Tuesday in Pitkin and Eagle Counties because of dry conditions and high temperatures.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

People, plants and animals all enjoy the nearly 5,000 acres of land owned by Pitkin County Open Space and Trails. To make sure the shared space remains a thriving ecosystem, Open Space and Trails is turning to data collected on site.

Facebook/Verena Mallory Trail

An agreement has been reached to keep a popular trail open in the Hunter Creek Valley, resolving a years-long legal dispute.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

The City of Aspen has cut back on irrigation at most parks across town to meet a goal of reducing water consumption by 10 to 15 percent. But Wagner Park, in the city core, is managed pretty differently.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Colorado’s top recycling experts are gathering in Snowmass Village this week to discuss solutions for Colorado’s recycling challenges.

Clean Energy Economy for the Region (CLEER)

The upcoming election for the Holy Cross Energy board of directors has two contested seats.  

Brent Gardner-Smith/Aspen Journalism

The City of Aspen has agreed to move water rights for storage out of Castle and Maroon Creeks.

 

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Earlier this month, Aspen city council declared a "stage one" drought. This means the city is asking residents to voluntarily cut back on irrigation and water consumption and is requiring that city government do the same.

Courtesy of Bluegreen Aspen

On Tuesday, Pitkin County commissioners and Basalt town council members will hear an update on plans to upgrade the areas surrounding the whitewater park.

Courtesy of the Wilderness Workshop

Last week, the Wilderness Workshop announced that executive director Sloan Shoemaker was stepping down after 21 years with the conservation organization. Will Roush, who has been with Wilderness Workshop since 2009, will take over the position in September. They both spoke with Aspen Public Radio environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy about the organization and the transition.

Courtesy of CLEER

Ed Mazria founded the organization Architecture 2030, with the goal that all new buildings will be carbon-neutral by 2030. Last week, he spoke at a symposium in Carbondale that was hosted by local energy efficiency organizations.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Before Independence Pass opens to vehicles next week, a local nonprofit is encouraging cyclists to enjoy the empty road, for a cause.

Courtesy of The Mountain Pact

Earlier this month, Aspen city council member Ann Mullins traveled to Washington D.C. to advocate for public lands issues. She was there with the Mountain Pact, an advocacy group representing mountain communities.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

At a meeting this week, Garfield County Commissioners agreed to continue funding ongoing work to improve the health of Cattle Creek.

www.facebook.com/aspenpolice

Aspen police are asking city council to approve a new law aimed at keeping people from harassing wildlife. It comes amid growing concerns about public safety — and the health of local bears.

Two local filmmakers are bringing the story of Roaring Fork Valley farmers to the big screen. The award-winning documentary “How We Grow” makes its home premiere this weekend.

Courtesy of Ann Mullins

Aspen city councilmember Ann Mullins was among elected representatives from five mountain communities who traveled to Washington D.C. last week. They were there with the advocacy group Mountain Pact.

Alycin Bektesh

This January, Aaron Million filed a claim for water on the Green River, with plans to divert it to Colorado’s Front Range. The proposal, and the many objections filed in response to it, have raised questions about just how much water is available from the Colorado River and its tributaries.

Courtesy of Wilderness Workshop

The City of Aspen is making progress toward settlement in a state water court case regarding storage rights on Castle and Maroon Creeks.

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