Listen Live

Glenwood Springs' Women's March Looks To Include All Women

Jan 21, 2020

The crowd at Saturday's Women's March held their signs high as they marched down Grand Avenue in Glenwood Springs.
Credit Molly Dove / Aspen Public Radio

Standing on a black metal picnic table in Centennial Park in downtown Glenwood Springs, local activist Sophia Clark addressed a crowd of over 100 people during this year’s Women’s March on Saturday. 

The main focus of the nation-wide event was making sure all women are included in the fight for equality and representation. 

Clark’s speech highlighted immigration issues and invoked the idea that sometimes, women only fight for the equality of other women who look like them.

“Are we fighting for our freedom, or the freedom of all women?” Clark asked the crowd. “When we say women, do we mean working-class and poor women? Undocumented women? Trans women?”

The crowd marched down Grand Avenue in Downtown Glenwood Springs holding posters that read “Girl Power” and “Love Trump Hates,” while chanting, “No hate, no fear, everybody’s welcome here” and “This is what democracy looks like.” 

Jasmin Ramirez, recently-elected first woman of color to Roaring Fork School Districts' Board of Education, addresses the crowd at Saturday's Women's March in Glenwood Springs.
Credit Molly Dove / Aspen Public Radio

Jasmin Ramirez, the recently-elected first woman of color to the Roaring Fork School District Board of Education, wrapped up the march by encouraging everyone to vote in the upcoming November election. 

“I’m not saying that we have to vote for women because we are women, but we must vote,” she said. 

The 2020 Women’s Marches in Glenwood Springs and Aspen were just two out of the 250 marches on Saturday that took place across the country.