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Forests

Lessons from Paradise: Kirk Siegler, Correspondent on NPR’s National Desk

Kirk Siegler will be in conversation with Aspen Public Radio’s Executive Director Tammy Terwelp, Friday, March 29, 6:30 PM, at The Temporary in Basalt.

Courtesy of U.S. Forest Service

The U.S. Forest Service will hold a public meeting tonight to gather feedback about a plan to cut back trees in the upper Fryingpan.

Courtesy of U.S. Forest Service

Fire officials are keeping a close eye on a fire burning about a mile northwest of Highland Bowl.

The Maroon Fire was ignited by lightning last Tuesday, and smoke was visible yesterday. Firefighters are not on the ground because of potential dangers.

Website details how climate change will alter forests

Nov 11, 2015
forestforecasts.org

The look of the forests in the Roaring Fork Valley may be dramatically different in the future. High elevation forests could be replaced with lower growing species like aspens. A new website shows how forests in the American West will look different under climate change. The local nonprofit Aspen Center for Environmental Studies worked with scientists to develop the site.

Jamie Werner is Forest Program Director at ACES. Her laptop’s propped open and she’s clicking around the site, forestforecasts.org.

"So here we have Aspen Mountain and Aspen Highlands…”

aspenjournalism.org

In order to improve forest health and habitat for wildlife, a coalition of outdoor organizations is planning a prescribed fire in Hunter Creek. It's a popular recreation area near Aspen. 

Barring bad weather and safety concerns, the burn will be done in spring of 2016. It’ll happen on Forest Service land on north side of the Hunter Creek Valley, near the “lower plunge trail” and “hummingbird traverse.” The historic buildings on the valley floor won’t be in the burn area.

Many aspen, cottonwood leaves dying early

Sep 10, 2015
W. Jacobi/Colorado State University

The Colorado State Forest Service says certain trees will be less colorful this fall. A wet spring and summer have been ideal conditions for at least two kind of fungus that are affecting aspen and cottonwood trees across much of Colorado.

Forest Service visitor center opens at Aspen Highlands

May 26, 2015
Marci Krivonen

The White River National Forest’s newest visitors center officially opens Tuesday. The Forest Service moved the center from Aspen to Highlands to make visits more convenient for the public, and to save money. 

On Friday visitor information specialist Mateo Sandete was putting finishing touches on interpretive signs. Visitors trickled in over Memorial Day weekend for a soft opening. Sandete says the new location is advantageous given the nearby Maroon Bells.

Forest Service visitor's center moves to Highlands

May 19, 2015
White River National Forest

There will be a new Forest Service visitors’ center at the base of Highlands starting next week. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason has more.

 

The new center will be in the Highlands ticket office. It’s aimed to better serve people going to the Maroon Bells —

www.fs.usda.gov

Colorado’s Mountain Pine Beetle epidemic is subsiding but a new threat is on the rise. The Spruce beetle has killed large swaths of forests in Colorado’s southwest and a new report shows the Roaring Fork watershed is at risk. Drought and climate change are weakening trees, giving this native beetle a larger area to attack. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Jamie Cundiff. She’s the Forest Programs Director for the Aspen Center for Environmental Studies.

Mountain Edition - February 27th, 2014

Feb 27, 2014

For Aspen athletes who competed in the Winter Olympics, their season isn’t over yet. Cross country ski sprinter Simi Hamilton says he has several races left.

Weeds are growing more abundantly on the White River National Forest as the agency grapples with budget cuts and fewer staff.

A Colorado Forest Service report shows the state’s forests continue to be hammered by insects and disease, especially at high altitudes.

Most skiers probably don’t realize Aspen Mountain is full of holes...from a history of mining. We’ll take you on a wintry history tour.

Finally, a group of “legally blind” skiers takes to the slopes at Snowmass. For these teenagers, the activity is empowering.

www.puma-net.org

 

     Insects and disease continue to assault forests across Colorado  The biggest growing threat is a beetle that's attacking high altitude trees. In the Roaring Fork Valley, the danger for private landowners comes from an insect that's been ravaging the state for much longer. It attacks lodgepole pines. That’s according to a new report by the Colorado Forest Service. To learn more, Aspen Public Radio's Elise Thatcher spoke with Colorado Forest Service Ranger Kelly Rogers. 

 

CU Boulder

Large swathes of spruce forests in the Northern Colorado mountains are dying due to the Spruce Beetle. Now, researchers are linking these massive beetle outbreaks to drought. The beetles’ impact on forests has the potential to be more devastating in Colorado than the mountain pine beetle. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Sarah Hart, the lead author of the study. She says her team went over 300 years of drought data.

Federal Highway Administration

Cell towers disguised as trees will be erected soon in Glenwood Canyon. It’s a project years in the making. One Forest Service employee has been with the project since day one. Donna Graham’s focus has been to make the towers and their infrastructure mesh with the scenery.

Congressman Scott Tipton - In Conversation

Jul 18, 2013
Chris Janjic

Representative Scott Tipton (R-CO) who represents Colorado's 3rd Congressional District was a speaker at the annual Lincoln Day Dinner hosted by Pitkin County Republicans.  He stopped at Aspen Public Radio's studios for an interview.  He spoke with APR's Roger Adams about:

Forest fire prevention

Western water rights

Rebuilding the GOP

and, his recent reelection.