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climate change

Aspen Skiing Company

Aspen Skiing Company announced Wednesday that it is once again stepping into the political arena with its latest advertising campaign; this season’s marketing focuses on climate change.

Mike Molloy

For nearly a decade, biologists with the nonprofit Rocky Mountain Wild and the Denver Zoo have studied pikas on the Front Range; this summer, that work is expanding to the White River National Forest. Scientists want to know how a warming climate will impact the alpine ecosystem and are hoping pikas can provide some clues.

 

Gina McCarthy is the director of the Center For Climate, Heath and the Global Environment at Harvard. She was the former administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency under President Obama.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

A panel discussion Tuesday will address what the changing climate means for recreation, agriculture and local economies.

On Friday, an Aspen-based organization awarded $250,000 to 10 groups working on solutions to climate change.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Communities of color and those living in poverty are more likely than others to be exposed to air pollution, toxic waste and water contamination than others in the United States, and studies show the impacts of climate change will also hit these communities harder. Environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy recently spoke with two men who have spent their lives deeply engaged in fighting for civil rights and are now tackling climate activism.

 

Courtesy of Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

In 2016, the world’s largest investment firm issued a report saying that climate change must be a factor in money management. On Wednesday, BlackRock Vice Chairman Philipp Hildebrand will discuss sustainable investing.

Courtesy of Wild Rose Education

A handful of middle and high school students from across the Roaring Fork Valley spent the week learning about climate change and making films.

 

Host Alycin Bektesh is joined by Christine Benedetti, editor of Aspen Magazine, Curtis Wackerle, editor of the Aspen Daily News, and Auden Schendler, author of Getting Green Done. His article How to fix the mountain town housing crisis was recently published in Outside Magazine.

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper is joining forces with an organization started by Aspen Mayor Steve Skadron.

Courtesy of Aspen Global Change Institute

Over twenty years ago, Dr. Ben Santer was part of the team of international scientists who first published work showing climate change can be attributed to human influence. He discussed his work with Elizabeth Stewart-Severy.

 

Courtesy of Glynwood Farm

  The way we eat contributes to a warmer world. An author, soil scientist and farmer will discuss “resilient agriculture” in Aspen on Thursday.

Courtesy of instagram.com/govofco

On Tuesday, Colorado became the latest state — and the first in the Rocky Mountain region — to commit to fighting climate change.

Courtesy of nps.gov

As scientists work to understand and address a changing climate, some are exploring creative and unusual approaches. Environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy sat in on a discussion about “climate moonshots” at last week’s Aspen Ideas Festival. She talked with producer Christin Kay about why some scientists want to resurrect wooly mammoths.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

The Aspen Ideas Festival brings together top thinkers across a wide variety of topics and issues — and a daily environmental fix.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

The Spotlight Health series wrapped up last weekend This year, it included a focus on how environmental factors influence health. Elizabeth Stewart-Severy was there for several discussions on this topic, including one called “Human Health and the Planet.” She spoke about this with producer Christin Kay.

 

 

 

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

American Renewable Energy Day (AREDAY), has grown from a one-day expo to a nearly week-long summit. This year’s event kicked off yesterday in Snowmass. Environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy was there and shares what she learned with news director Carolyn Sackariason.

Courtesy of www.climate-mayors.org

President Trump’s announcement Thursday that the U.S. is withdrawing from the Paris Agreement hit close to home.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Pitkin County’s plan for dealing with natural hazards is due for an update. The 2017 edition will consider climate change impacts.

Instagram/whitehouse

Local governments in the Roaring Fork Valley have long grappled with environmental issues, including work to lower greenhouse gas emissions, protect wilderness areas from overuse, keep water in the rivers and more. For the first time in many local elected officials’ tenure, these priorities are under threat from the national administration. Elizabeth Stewart-Severy asked local officials how they are working to influence national policy.

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