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People from around the Roaring Fork Valley have all been impacted in some way by the COVID-19 pandemic. Now many are sharing their experiences to collect and memorialize the valley’s COVID-19 pandemic history.“Quarantine Stories: Recording History" is a community oral history project from Aspen Public Radio and Aspen Historical Society, featuring self-recorded interviews from individuals and families during these historic times.You can participate by interviewing your family or telling us your story. What are you feeling and seeing? What motivates you? What scares you? What is the day like outside your window?00000176-6d2a-dc2f-ad76-6d2a4f990001Record and send in an audio clip to be preserved in perpetuity in the Aspen Historical Society archive. The future may be uncertain, but together we can capture history happening in real time.There are two easy ways to submit your recording:1. Record it as voice memo on your smartphone and email it to aspenpublicradio@gmail.com.2. Call 970-812-3726 and leave your story as a voicemail00000176-6d2a-dc2f-ad76-6d2a4f9b0000Support for “Quarantine Stories: Recording History" comes from Aspen Center for Environmental Studies educating for environmental responsibility since 1968.*By submitting your story, you agree to it being aired on Aspen Public Radio and archived for future use by Aspen Historical Society for educational and archival purposes as set forth here.

Matilda Barth: 'Remembering When Life Was Fun'

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Matilda Barth saw first-hand how quickly life can change. She anticipated a stressful end to her junior year, filled with Advanced Placement and SAT tests. The pandemic turned that imagined future into an uninspiring spring of staring at a computer. 

 

“The world had completely shifted in the blink of an eye,” she said. “Online school seemed impossible. We lack the motivation to sit in front of a computer for six hours a day and teach ourselves how to do algebra.”

 

 

Barth said she saw how much she and her classmates missed being at school. 

 

“Students realized how much they took school for granted. Our days were empty and boring, and we missed those friends we only saw at school.”