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All Things Considered With Daniel Costello

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NPR's flagship evening newsmagazine delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Audie Cornish, Ari Shapiro, Ailsa Chang and Mary Louise Kelly present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

Arizona is one of just five states that has seen new coronavirus cases climb by the thousands each day in the past couple of weeks.

The state's governor, Republican Doug Ducey, in May lifted a stay-at-home order he put in place in March so the economy could begin reopening. But a week ago, Ducey ordered bars, gyms, movie theaters and water parks to shut down again for 30 days as daily caseloads topped 3,000.

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It is one of the most intimate and complicated relationships around, and for many women — and yes it's mostly women — an all-important one.

I'm talking about the relationship between a mother and her child's caregiver. And that's the relationship at the heart of author J. Courtney Sullivan's new novel, Friends and Strangers. She says the idea for the book came from her own experiences.

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Coronavirus cases keep increasing at alarming rates across the country, and this comes as many school districts are wrestling with when and how to reopen. It is not an easy decision. There's the issue of safety, and that's complicated because students, teachers and parents all have different COVID-19 risk levels. Then there's how to teach students virtually or partially online and partially in a classroom and how to support low-income students without adequate Internet access and students with learning disabilities.

Movie Interview: 'The Outpost'

Jul 4, 2020

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A military helicopter descends into an Afghan mountain valley surrounded by switchbacks to a U.S. Army outpost-turned-sitting target for Taliban fighters.

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UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR #1: (As character) Captain - how're you doing, sir? Welcome to the dark side of the moon, gentlemen.

UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR #2: (As character) Delighted, sir.

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June 2020 was a pride month that looked different from past years, and not just because people were socially distancing and wearing masks: Demonstrations for LGBTQ equality overlapped with protests against violence and systemic racism against Black people.

At the intersection of these two fights for equality are Black transgender people.

Imara Jones, an independent journalist and founder of TransLash media, told NPR's All Things Considered, that this moment has been "a crucible."

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To Arizona now, where the state is reporting some of the worst coronavirus numbers in the country. Hospitals are filling up. The Republican governor, Doug Ducey, is asking for help. NPR's Will Stone has the latest.

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Pride month is over, and it looked a little different this year, not just because people were social distancing and wearing masks. Demonstrations for LGBTQ equality overlapped with protests against violence and systemic racism against Black people. At the intersection of these two fights for equality are Black transgender people. A couple weeks ago, organizers estimate that 15,000 people gathered in Brooklyn to march for Black trans lives. It's believed to have been the biggest-ever gathering of its kind.

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The shooting death of a popular singer has thrown Ethiopia into turmoil. Thousands have taken to the streets in protest, and more than 80 have died in clashes with security forces as NPR's Eyder Peralta reports.

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The surge in COVID-19 infections throughout Alabama is forcing Gov. Kay Ivey to rethink plans to reopen the state.

For the last seven days, Alabama has logged an average of nearly 1,000 new daily coronavirus cases, with hospitalizations at their highest level since the pandemic began.

A surveillance camera is said to have recorded it all: a woman in a black t-shirt stepping out of a tan minivan; the lighting of a toilet-paper fuse, the arc of a beer bottle filled with fuel as it was thrown onto the dashboard of an empty police car. That act of vandalism, in the early hours of May 30, is why two Brooklyn lawyers are fighting federal explosives charges and could face as much as life in prison.

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COVID-19 infections are now on the rise in 40 states, and that is forcing many governors to rethink their reopening plans. In Alabama yesterday, Gov. Kay Ivey extended her state's safer-at-home orders until the end of July.

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KAY IVEY: While we are not overwhelmed yet, we should not think that because our summer feels more normal than our spring that we are back to normal. Fact is, folks, we are still in the thick of this virus disease, and it is deadly.

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This week, Bob Dylan's first album of new music in eight years, Rough and Rowdy Ways, rose to No. 2 on the Billboard albums chart, making him the first ever artist to have a Top 40 album in every decade since the 1960s. But Bob Dylan is not alone in making vital new music well into what some might call his "retirement" years.

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Tourism has been decimated by coronavirus closures. And that's been especially tough in areas that rely heavily on seasonal dollars, like the Berkshires in western Massachusetts. Andrea Shea of member station WBUR reports on the region's creative economy now shut down by the pandemic.

ANDREA SHEA, BYLINE: During a normal summer, 350,000 visitors set up blankets and coolers on the lawn at the Tanglewood Music Festival in Lenox to hear music in the open air.

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