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Arts & Culture

Aspen Public Radio's coverage of Arts & Culture is funded by the Stephan Edlis and Gael Neeson Foundation.

Courtesy Aspen Art Museum

The Aspen Art Museum recently opened its newest exhibition—a multimedia collection by artist Barbara Kasten called “Scenarios.” Along with pieces that incorporate painting, sculpture and photography, the exhibition includes three of Kasten’s video installations, which is the most comprehensive collection of her non-photographic work in the United States. Although, Kasten says the new medium is all part of her progression as an artist.

“It’s really an extension of photography and an extension of the ideas that I’ve been working with all my life,” she said.

Courtesy Lindsay Jones

You can find an English language version of this story here.

Antes de la pandemia, los trabajadores independientes representaban alrededor de un cuarto de la fuerza de trabajo, y ese número sólo ha crecido desde el golpe de COVID-19. Millones de personas más se han unido a la economía del contratismo (gig economy) este año, ya que los empleadores han eliminado puestos de trabajo de tiempo parcial y de tiempo completo - más de un tercio de los trabajadores estadounidenses ahora dicen que son parte de esta economía. Algunos economistas dicen que dentro de 10 años, la mitad de la fuerza laboral en los Estados Unidos serán trabajadores independientes.

Entonces, ¿qué piensan los freelancers del Valle de Roaring Fork sobre las elecciones de este año? La diseñadora gráfica e ilustradora local Lindsay Jones habló con Aspen Public Radio sobre sus pensamientos antes de emitir su voto en noviembre durante la  primera parte de nuestra serie electoral: "¿Qué puedo esperar de mi gobierno?"

Courtesy Lindsay Jones

Before the pandemic, freelancers accounted for about a quarter of the workforce, and that number has only grown since COVID-19 hit. Millions more have joined the gig economy this year as employers have shed part and full-time positions—over a third of American workers now say they’re part of the gig economy. Some economists say that within 10 years, half the American workforce will be freelance workers.

So, what do freelancers in the Roaring Fork Valley think about this year’s election?

Courtesy Creative Commons

This is Week In The Arts—a curation of virtual events, exhibitions and reopenings around the Roaring Fork Valley.

David Hiser

To coincide with the 50th anniversary of Hunter S. Thompson’s historic race to become sheriff of Pitkin County, the new documentary, “Freak Power: the Ballot or the Bomb,” debuts on Friday, Oct. 23. While the film chronicles the gonzo journalist’s 1970 campaign in Aspen, parts of it feel eerily similar to today.

Courtesy 5Point Film

Carbondale’s 5Point Adventure Film Festival was one of the first events to feel the effects of the pandemic last spring. The annual festival runs each April, but new social-distancing protocols left organizers with few options aside from postponing the full mountain film showcase altogether.

Since then, 5Point’s reimagined its annual festival into a fully virtual event running each night from Wednesday, Oct. 14 to Sunday, Oct. 18. Audiences can livestream a curated selection of short adventure films each night, which are followed by Q and A sessions with the filmmakers. 

Courtesy Aspen Film


When Aspen Film kicks off its 41st annual FilmFest on Thursday, Oct. 15 , it might be nostalgic for local filmgoers; the festival is hosting its opening and closing night screenings in-person at Aspen’s Isis Theatre.

Courtesy Thunder River Theatre Company

This is Week In The Arts—a curation of virtual events, exhibitions and reopenings around the Roaring Fork Valley.

Courtesy Red Brick Center for the Arts

This is Week In The Arts—a curation of virtual events, exhibits and reopenings around the Roaring Fork Valley.

Courtesy Jackson Emmer/Revival Photographic

Things are a little different since the last time Carbondale-based singer and songwriter Jackson Emmer released an album. That was in 2018, when his sophomore album “Jukebox” received national attention, and live concerts were part of his touring schedule. His newest album, “Alpine Coda,” comes out Friday, Oct. 2, and he’ll be hitting the virtual road to promote it.

Basalt Regional Library Facebook Page

This is Week In The Arts—a curation of virtual events, exhibits and reopenings around the Roaring Fork Valley.

Courtesy Teton Gravity Research

Drive-in movies have seen a comeback this summer thanks to COVID-19 public health protocols, but the most recent films playing at Buttermilk’s drive-in theatre as part of The Meeting FilmFest have audiences dreaming of winter. 

Creative Commons

 


Shanti Gruber’s varsity choir class was in the midst of rehearsals for their recital season when COVID-19 shut down everything—classrooms included—last spring. 

“Our spring semester is where we do a lot of travel, we have big concerts, we have competitions,” said Gruber. 

Gruber is also the district lead music teacher, and the choir director for both the high school, and Glenwood Springs Middle School. She’s taught her varsity choir group since they were in 6th grade. The ensemble ultimately had to scrap their in-person performance due to public health protocols, and record one song virtually together instead.

Aspen Valley Ski and Snowboard Club

This is Week In The Arts—a curation of virtual events, exhibits and reopenings around the Roaring Fork Valley. 

Daniel Bayer Photography

 

Have you ever fallen in love with a place, and seen it change before your eyes? That’s the question local writers were asked for the Community Office for Resource Efficiency, or CORE’s, month-long storytelling workshop in August, in partnership with the Aspen Center for Environmental Studies (ACES) and Lead with Love. Local storyteller Alya Howe worked with writers to develop their own tales for the workshop’s theme, “Climate of Love,” which explores climate change in the Roaring Fork Valley. 

Courtesy The Art Base

This is Week In The Arts—a curation of virtual events, exhibits and reopenings around the Roaring Fork Valley.

Courtesy Tamara Susa

This is Week In The Arts — a curation of virtual events, exhibits and reopenings around the Roaring Fork Valley.

Hannah Berman & Caroline Tory

Four new Little Free Libraries have popped up in Aspen that will be stocked with books by Black authors and anti-racist literature. Aspen Words partnered with Aspen Skiing Company and local advocacy group Roaring Fork Show Up to build and stock the new bookshelves. 

Courtesy Carbondale Arts

Two new exhibitions are coming to Carbondale Arts’ R2 Gallery as part of the local art organization’s First Friday celebration on Friday, Sept. 4. The event kicks off with an outdoor talk featuring exhibiting artists Brian Colley, Wewer Keohane and Andrew Roberts-Gray at 5:30 p.m., and the gallery will open to up to 10 visitors at a time at 7 p.m.

Courtesy Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

This is Week In The Arts—a curation of virtual events, exhibits and reopenings around the Roaring Fork Valley.

Courtesy Aspen Film

Aspen Film begins streaming the documentary “They Ain’t Ready For Me” on Sunday, Aug. 30. The film follows Tamar Manasseh, a Black rabbinical student organizing against gun violence on Chicago’s South Side.

Creative Commons

When COVID-19 shut down schools, businesses and ski resorts back in March, Aspen Skiing Company employees also found themselves sitting at home. They decided to use the time to write and produce an original song called “See You,” which will be available for download on Spotify, Apple Music and Amazon Music this week.

Kirsten Dobroth/Aspen Public Radio

This is Week In The Arts—a curation of virtual events, exhibits and reopenings around the Roaring Fork Valley.

Aspen Historical Society

 


August 18, 2020 marks 100 years since the 19th Amendment was ratified, which guaranteed voting rights for women in the United States. Aspen Historical Society and Aspen Snowmass are commemorating the occasion with educational programming at Gondola Plaza in Snowmass Base Village (August 18, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.), and the historical society’s vice president Nina Gabianelli spoke to Aspen Public Radio about the significance of the anniversary.

 

Jeremy Swanson

This is Week In The Arts—a curation of virtual exhibits, events and reopenings around the Roaring Fork Valley.

Courtesy Lindsay Jones

Restaurants around the Roaring Fork Valley have expanded outdoor seating due to the pandemic. In Old Town Basalt and along a strip in Willits, those new makeshift patios are enclosed by concrete barriers to keep diners from spilling into the street and surrounding parking lot.

The Basalt Public Arts Commission (BPAC) saw those blank canvases as an opportunity for a new public arts project, and a way to put artists back to work that have been hit economically by COVID-19. BPAC put out a call to Roaring Fork Valley artists to create a line of colorful murals along the makeshift fencing as part of its Concrete Barriers Art Project.

Strange Dirt/Courtesy Skye Gallery

Denver artist Marsha Robinson goes by Strange Dirt, and her first solo exhibition just opened at Skye Gallery in downtown Aspen. The collection is called "Sanctuary," and features an array of flora, fauna and bugs drawn by the self-taught artist. 

Wolfgang Volz © 2020 Christo

On August 10, 1972, the artist Christo unfurled his work “Valley Curtain” across Rifle Gap in Rifle, Colo. The piece involved over 200,000 square feet of sunset-hued nylon fabric that was slung across a quarter mile span between the valley walls. It took more than two years for Christo to realize his work, and the piece was torn down by the wind in less than two days. 

Christo’s official Facebook page announced on May 31, 2020 that the artist had died at the age of 84. Despite the fleeting nature of his work, according to those who saw “Valley Curtain” and other installations, his impact on the art world will be hard to forget.

Courtesy Aspen Historical Society/Ross Daniels

This is Week In The Arts—a curation of virtual events, exhibits and reopenings around the Roaring Fork Valley.

Daniel Bayer Photography

Have you ever fallen in love with a place, and seen it change before your eyes? That's the question at the root of the Community Office for Resource Efficiency's (CORE) storytelling workshop, which runs throughout the month of August (August 6-27).

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